Louisiana Civil Code

Table of Contents (Download PDF)

CHAPTER 9 - REDHIBITION

Art. 2520. The seller warrants the buyer against redhibitory defects, or vices, in the thing sold.

A defect is redhibitory when it renders the thing useless, or its use so inconvenient that it must be presumed that a buyer would not have bought the thing had he known of the defect. The existence of such a defect gives a buyer the right to obtain rescission of the sale.

A defect is redhibitory also when, without rendering the thing totally useless, it diminishes its usefulness or its value so that it must be presumed that a buyer would still have bought it but for a lesser price. The existence of such a defect limits the right of a buyer to a reduction of the price. [Acts 1993, No. 841, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1995]

Art. 2521. The seller owes no warranty for defects in the thing that were known to the buyer at the time of the sale, or for defects that should have been discovered by a reasonably prudent buyer of such things. [Acts 1993, No. 841, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1995]

Art. 2522. The buyer must give the seller notice of the existence of a redhibitory defect in the thing sold. That notice must be sufficiently timely as to allow the seller the opportunity to make the required repairs. A buyer who fails to give that notice suffers diminution of the warranty to the extent the seller can show that the defect could have been repaired or that the repairs would have been less burdensome, had he received timely notice.

Such notice is not required when the seller has actual knowledge of the existence of a redhibitory defect in the thing sold. [Acts 1993, No. 841, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1995]

Art. 2523. [Reserved]

Art. 2524. The thing sold must be reasonably fit for its ordinary use.

When the seller has reason to know the particular use the buyer intends for the thing, or the buyer's particular purpose for buying the thing, and that the buyer is relying on the seller's skill or judgment in selecting it, the thing sold must be fit for the buyer's intended use or for his particular purpose.

If the thing is not so fit, the buyer's rights are governed by the general rules of conventional obligations. [Acts 1993, No. 841, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1995]

Arts. 2525-2528. [Reserved]

Art. 2529. When the thing the seller has delivered, though in itself free from redhibitory defects, is not of the kind or quality specified in the contract or represented by the seller, the rights of the buyer are governed by other rules of sale and conventional obligations. [Acts 1993, No. 841, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1995]

Art. 2530. The warranty against redhibitory defects covers only defects that exist at the time of delivery. The defect shall be presumed to have existed at the time of delivery if it appears within three days from that time. [Acts 1993, No. 841, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1995]

Art. 2531. A seller who did not know that the thing he sold had a defect is only bound to repair, remedy, or correct the defect. If he is unable or fails so to do, he is then bound to return the price to the buyer with interest from the time it was paid, and to reimburse him for the reasonable expenses occasioned by the sale, as well as those incurred for the preservation of the thing, less the credit to which the seller is entitled if the use made of the thing, or the fruits it has yielded, were of some value to the buyer.

A seller who is held liable for a redhibitory defect has an action against the manufacturer of the defective thing, if the defect existed at the time the thing was delivered by the manufacturer to the seller, for any loss the seller sustained because of the redhibition. Any contractual provision that attempts to limit, diminish or prevent such recovery by a seller against the manufacturer shall have no effect. [Amended by Acts 1974, No. 673, §1; Acts 1993, No. 841, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1995]

Art. 2532. A buyer who obtains rescission because of a redhibitory defect is bound to return the thing to the seller, for which purpose he must take care of the thing as a prudent administrator, but is not bound to deliver it back until all his claims, or judgments, arising from the defect are satisfied.

If the redhibitory defect has caused the destruction of the thing the loss is borne by the seller, and the buyer may bring his action even after the destruction has occurred.

If the thing is destroyed by a fortuitous event before the buyer gives the seller notice of the existence of a redhibitory defect that would have given rise to a rescission of the sale, the loss is borne by the buyer.

After such notice is given, the loss is borne by the seller, except to the extent the buyer has insured that loss. A seller who returns the price, or a part thereof, is subrogated to the buyer's right against third persons who may be liable for the destruction of the thing. [Acts 1993, No. 841, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1995]

Art. 2533. [Reserved]

Art. 2534. A.(1) The action for redhibition against a seller who did not know of the existence of a defect in the thing sold prescribes in four years from the day delivery of such thing was made to the buyer or one year from the day the defect was discovered by the buyer, whichever occurs first.

(2) However, when the defect is of residential or commercial immovable property, an action for redhibition against a seller who did not know of the existence of the defect prescribes in one year from the day delivery of the property was made to the buyer.

B. The action for redhibition against a seller who knew, or is presumed to have known, of the existence of a defect in the thing sold prescribes in one year from the day the defect was discovered by the buyer.

C. In any case prescription is interrupted when the seller accepts the thing for repairs and commences anew from the day he tenders it back to the buyer or notifies the buyer of his refusal or inability to make the required repairs. [Acts 1993, No. 841, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1995; Acts 1995, No. 172, §1; Acts 1997, No. 266, §1]

Arts. 2535-2536. [Reserved]

Art. 2537. Judicial sales resulting from a seizure are not subject to the rules on redhibition. [Acts 1993, No. 841, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1995]

Art. 2538. The warranty against redhibitory vices is owed by each of multiple sellers in proportion to his interest.

Multiple buyers must concur in an action for rescission because of a redhibitory defect. An action for reduction of the price may be brought by one of multiple buyers in proportion to his interest.

The same rules apply if a thing with a redhibitory defect is transferred, inter vivos or mortis causa, to multiple successors. [Acts 1993, No. 841, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1995]

Art. 2539. [Reserved]

Art. 2540. When more than one thing are sold together as a whole so that the buyer would not have bought one thing without the other or others, a redhibitory defect in one of such things gives rise to redhibition for the whole. [Acts 1993, No. 841, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1995]

Art. 2541. A buyer may choose to seek only reduction of the price even when the redhibitory defect is such as to give him the right to obtain rescission of the sale.

In an action for rescission because of a redhibitory defect the court may limit the remedy of the buyer to a reduction of the price. [Acts 1993, No. 841, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1995]

Arts. 2542-2544. [Reserved]

Art. 2545. A seller who knows that the thing he sells has a defect but omits to declare it, or a seller who declares that the thing has a quality that he knows it does not have, is liable to the buyer for the return of the price with interest from the time it was paid, for the reimbursement of the reasonable expenses occasioned by the sale and those incurred for the preservation of the thing, and also for damages and reasonable attorney fees. If the use made of the thing, or the fruits it might have yielded, were of some value to the buyer, such a seller may be allowed credit for such use or fruits.

A seller is deemed to know that the thing he sells has a redhibitory defect when he is a manufacturer of that thing. [Amended by Acts 1968, No. 84, §1; Acts 1993, No. 841, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1995]

Arts. 2546-2547. [Reserved]

Art. 2548. The parties may agree to an exclusion or limitation of the warranty against redhibitory defects. The terms of the exclusion or limitation must be clear and unambiguous and must be brought to the attention of the buyer.

A buyer is not bound by an otherwise effective exclusion or limitation of the warranty when the seller has declared that the thing has a quality that he knew it did not have.

The buyer is subrogated to the rights in warranty of the seller against other persons, even when the warranty is excluded. [Acts 1993, No. 841, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1995]

CHAPITRE 9 – DES VICES RÉDHIBITOIRES

Art. 2520. Le vendeur garantit l’acheteur contre les défauts ou vices rédhibitoires de la chose vendue.

Un défaut est rédhibitoire lorsqu’il rend la chose inutile ou d’un usage tellement incommode qu’il doit être présumé que l’acheteur n’aurait pas acheté la chose s’il avait connu le défaut. L’existence d’un tel défaut donne à l’acheteur le droit d’obtenir la résolution de la vente.

Un défaut est également rédhibitoire lorsque, sans rendre la chose totalement inutile, il diminue son utilité ou sa valeur de telle sorte qu’il doit être présumé que l’acheteur l’aurait tout de même achetée mais à un moindre prix. L’existence d’un tel défaut limite le droit de l’acheteur à une réduction du prix. [Loi de 1993, n˚ 841, §1, en vigueur le 1er janvier 1995.]

Art. 2521. Le vendeur n’est tenu d’aucune garantie pour les défauts de la chose qui étaient connus de l’acheteur au moment de la vente ou pour les défauts qui auraient dû être découverts par un acheteur raisonnablement prudent de telles choses. [Loi de 1993, n˚ 841, §1, en vigueur le 1er janvier 1995.]

Art. 2522. L’acheteur doit notifier au vendeur l’existence d’un défaut rédhibitoire de la chose vendue. Cette notification doit être faite dans un temps suffisant pour permettre au vendeur d’effectuer les réparations nécessaires. À défaut de notification, l’acheteur supporte une diminution de la garantie dans la mesure où le vendeur peut montrer que le défaut aurait pu être réparé ou que les réparations auraient été moins onéreuses s’il avait reçu la notification à temps.

Cette notification n’est pas requise lorsque le vendeur a véritablement connaissance de l’existence d’un défaut rédhibitoire de la chose vendue. [Loi de 1993, n˚ 841, §1, en vigueur le 1er janvier 1995.]

Art. 2523. [Réservé]

Art. 2524. La chose vendue doit être raisonnablement adaptée à son usage ordinaire.

Lorsque le vendeur a des raisons de connaître l’usage particulier que l’acheteur entend faire de la chose, ou le but particulier dans lequel il l’achète, et que l’acheteur s’en remet à la compétence ou au jugement du vendeur pour la choisir, la chose vendue doit être adaptée à l’usage que l’acheteur entend en faire ou à son but particulier.

Lorsque la chose n’est pas ainsi adaptée, les droits de l’acheteur sont régis par les règles générales relatives aux obligations conventionnelles. [Loi de 1993, n˚ 841, §1, en vigueur le 1er janvier 1995.]

Arts. 2525 à 2528. [Réservés]

Art. 2529. Lorsque la chose que le vendeur a délivrée, bien qu’elle soit sans défaut rédhibitoire, n’est pas de la sorte ou de la qualité exprimée au contrat ou décrite par le vendeur, les droits de l’acheteur sont régis par d’autres règles relatives à la vente et aux obligations conventionnelles. [Loi de 1993, n˚ 841, §1, en vigueur le 1er janvier 1995.]

Art. 2530. La garantie contre les défauts rédhibitoires couvre seulement les défauts qui existent au moment de la délivrance. Le défaut est présumé avoir existé au moment de la délivrance s’il se manifeste dans les trois jours qui l’ont suivie. [Loi de 1993, n˚ 841, §1, en vigueur le 1er janvier 1995.]

Art. 2531. Le vendeur qui ignorait que la chose vendue comportait un défaut est seulement tenu de le réparer, d’y remédier ou de le corriger. S’il en est incapable ou manque à le faire, il est alors tenu de restituer le prix à l’acheteur, portant intérêts à compter du moment où il a été payé, et de lui rembourser les frais raisonnables occasionnés par la vente, de même que les dépenses faites pour la conservation de la chose, déduction faite de la créance à laquelle le vendeur peut prétendre dès lors que l’usage fait de la chose ou les fruits qu’elle a produits ont eu une valeur quelconque pour l’acheteur.

Le vendeur dont la responsabilité est engagée pour un défaut rédhibitoire dispose d’une action à l’encontre du fabricant de la chose défectueuse pour toute perte subie par le vendeur en raison du vice rédhibitoire, dès lors que le défaut existait au moment où le fabricant a délivrée la chose au vendeur. Toute stipulation contractuelle qui vise à limiter, diminuer ou empêcher un tel recouvrement par le vendeur à l’encontre du fabricant est sans effet. [Modifié par la loi de 1974, n˚ 673, §1 ; loi de 1993, n˚ 841, §1, en vigueur le 1er janvier 1995.]

Art. 2532. L’acheteur qui obtient la résolution en raison d’un défaut rédhibitoire est tenu de restituer la chose au vendeur. À cette fin, il doit prendre soin de la chose en administrateur prudent, mais il n’est pas tenu de la délivrer tant que l’ensemble de ses demandes ou jugements résultant du défaut ne sont pas satisfaits.

Lorsque le défaut rédhibitoire a causé la destruction de la chose, la perte est supportée par le vendeur, et l’acheteur peut intenter son action même après que la destruction soit survenue.

Lorsque la chose est détruite par cas fortuit avant que l’acheteur ne notifie au vendeur l’existence d’un défaut rédhibitoire qui aurait pu donner lieu à la résolution de la vente, la perte est supportée par l’acheteur.

Une fois cette notification faite, la perte est supportée par le vendeur, sauf si l’acheteur a assuré cette perte. Le vendeur qui restitue le prix, ou une partie de celui-ci, est subrogé dans les droits de l’acheteur contre les tiers qui peuvent être responsables de la destruction de la chose. [Loi de 1993, n˚ 841, §1, en vigueur le 1er janvier 1995.]

Art. 2533. [Réservé]

Art. 2534. A. (1) L’action en rédhibition contre le vendeur qui ignorait l’existence du défaut de la chose vendue se prescrit par quatre ans à compter du jour de la délivrance de la chose à l’acheteur ou par un an à compter du jour où le défaut a été découvert par l’acheteur, la première survenance devant être prise en compte.

(2) Cependant, lorsque le défaut affecte un bien immobilier résidentiel ou commercial, l’action en rédhibition contre le vendeur qui ignorait l’existence du défaut se prescrit par un an à compter du jour de la délivrance du bien à l’acheteur.

B. L’action en rédhibition contre le vendeur qui connaissait, ou qui est présumé avoir eu connaissance, de l’existence du défaut de la chose vendue se prescrit par un an à compter du jour où le défaut a été découvert par l’acheteur.

C. Dans tous les cas, la prescription est interrompue lorsque le vendeur accepte de réparer la chose ; elle recommence à courir du jour où il rend la chose à l’acheteur ou du jour où il lui notifie son refus ou son incapacité à effectuer les réparations requises. [Loi de 1993, n° 841, §1, en vigueur le 1er janvier 1995 ; Loi de 1995, n° 172, §1 ; Loi de 1997, n° 266, §1.]

Arts. 2535, 2536. [Réservés]

Art. 2537. Les ventes judiciaires sur saisie ne sont pas soumises aux règles relatives à la rédhibition. [Loi de 1993, n° 841, en vigueur le 1er janvier 1995.]

Art. 2538. La garantie des vices rédhibitoires est due par chacun des multiples vendeurs en proportion de son intérêt.

Les acheteurs multiples doivent prendre part à l’action en résolution fondée sur un défaut rédhibitoire. L’action en réduction du prix peut être intentée par l’un des acheteurs multiples en proportion de son intérêt.

Les mêmes règles s’appliquent lorsque la chose comportant un défaut rédhibitoire est transférée, entre vifs ou à cause de mort, à des ayants droit multiples. [Loi de 1993, n° 841, §1, en vigueur le 1er janvier 1995.]

Art. 2539. [Réservé]

Art. 2540. Lorsque plusieurs choses sont vendues ensemble comme un tout de sorte que l’acheteur n’aurait pas acheté une chose sans l’une ou les autres, le défaut rédhibitoire de l’une de ces choses donne lieu à rédhibition pour l’ensemble. [Loi de 1993, n° 841, §1, en vigueur le 1er janvier 1995.]

Art. 2541. L’acheteur peut choisir de demander la seule réduction du prix même lorsque le défaut rédhibitoire est tel qu’il lui donne le droit d’obtenir la résolution de la vente.

Dans une action en résolution en raison d’un défaut rédhibitoire, le juge peut limiter le recours de l’acheteur à une réduction du prix. [Loi de 1993, n° 841, §1, en vigueur le 1er janvier 1995.]

Arts. 2542 à 2544. [Réservés]

Art. 2545. Le vendeur qui sait que la chose qu’il vend comporte un défaut mais qui omet de le déclarer, ou le vendeur qui déclare que la chose a une qualité en sachant qu’elle ne la possède pas, est tenu envers l’acheteur à la restitution du prix avec intérêts à compter du moment où il a été payé, au remboursement des dépenses raisonnables occasionnées par la vente et à celles encourues pour la préservation de la chose, de même qu’aux dommages et intérêts et aux frais d’avocat pour autant qu’ils soient raisonnables.

Lorsque l’usage fait de la chose, ou les fruits qu’elle a pu produire, ont eu une valeur quelconque pour l’acheteur, ce vendeur peut disposer d’une créance sur cet usage ou ces fruits.

Le vendeur est réputé savoir que la chose qu’il vend comporte un défaut rédhibitoire lorsqu’il est le fabricant de cette chose. [Modifié par la loi de 1968, n° 84, §1 ; loi de 1993, n° 841, §1, en vigueur le 1er janvier 1995.]

Arts. 2546, 2547. [Réservés]

Art. 2548. Les parties peuvent s’accorder sur l’exclusion ou la limitation de la garantie des défauts rédhibitoires. Les termes de l’exclusion ou de la limitation doivent être clairs et non équivoques et doivent être portés à la connaissance de l’acheteur.

L’acheteur n’est pas lié par une exclusion ou une limitation de la garantie qui serait autrement efficace, lorsque le vendeur a déclaré que la chose a une qualité en sachant qu’elle ne la possède pas. L’acheteur est subrogé dans les droits en garantie du vendeur contre d’autres personnes, même lorsque la garantie est exclue. [Loi de 1993, n° 841, §1, en vigueur le 1er janvier 1995.]