Louisiana Civil Code

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CHAPTER 10 - SIMULATION

Art. 2025. A contract is a simulation when, by mutual agreement, it does not express the true intent of the parties.

If the true intent of the parties is expressed in a separate writing, that writing is a counterletter. [Acts 1984, No. 331, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1985]

Art. 2026. A simulation is absolute when the parties intend that their contract shall produce no effects between them. That simulation, therefore, can have no effects between the parties. [Acts 1984, No. 331, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1985]

Art. 2027. A simulation is relative when the parties intend that their contract shall produce effects between them though different from those recited in their contract. A relative simulation produces between the parties the effects they intended if all requirements for those effects have been met. [Acts 1984, No. 331, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1985]

Art. 2028. A. Any simulation, either absolute or relative, may have effects as to third persons.

B. Counterletters can have no effects against third persons in good faith. Nevertheless, if the counterletter involves immovable property, the principles of recordation apply with respect to third persons. [Acts 1984, No. 331, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1985; Acts 2012, No. 277, §1, eff. Aug. 1, 2012]

 

CHAPTER 11 - NULLITY

Art. 2029. A contract is null when the requirements for its formation have not been met. [Acts 1984, No. 331, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1985]

Art. 2030. A contract is absolutely null when it violates a rule of public order, as when the object of a contract is illicit or immoral. A contract that is absolutely null may not be confirmed.

Absolute nullity may be invoked by any person or may be declared by the court on its own initiative. [Acts 1984, No. 331, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1985]

Art. 2031. A contract is relatively null when it violates a rule intended for the protection of private parties, as when a party lacked capacity or did not give free consent at the time the contract was made. A contract that is only relatively null may be confirmed.

Relative nullity may be invoked only by those persons for whose interest the ground for nullity was established, and may not be declared by the court on its own initiative. [Acts 1984, No. 331, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1985]

Art. 2032. Action for annulment of an absolutely null contract does not prescribe.

Action of annulment of a relatively null contract must be brought within five years from the time the ground for nullity either ceased, as in the case of incapacity or duress, or was discovered, as in the case of error or fraud.

Nullity may be raised at any time as a defense against an action on the contract, even after the action for annulment has prescribed. [Acts 1984, No. 331, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1985]

Art. 2033. An absolutely null contract, or a relatively null contract that has been declared null by the court, is deemed never to have existed. The parties must be restored to the situation that existed before the contract was made. If it is impossible or impracticable to make restoration in kind, it may be made through an award of damages.

Nevertheless, a performance rendered under a contract that is absolutely null because its object or its cause is illicit or immoral may not be recovered by a party who knew or should have known of the defect that makes the contract null. The performance may be recovered, however, when that party invokes the nullity to withdraw from the contract before its purpose is achieved and also in exceptional situations when, in the discretion of the court, that recovery would further the interest of justice.

Absolute nullity may be raised as a defense even by a party who, at the time the contract was made, knew or should have known of the defect that makes the contract null. [Acts 1984, No. 331, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1985]

Art. 2034. Nullity of a provision does not render the whole contract null unless, from the nature of the provision or the intention of the parties, it can be presumed that the contract would not have been made without the null provision. [Acts 1984, No. 331, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1985]

Art. 2035. Nullity of a contract does not impair the rights acquired through an onerous contract by a third party in good faith.

If the contract involves immovable property, the principles of recordation apply to a third person acquiring an interest in the property whether by onerous or gratuitous title. [Acts 1984, No. 331, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1985; Acts 2005, No. 169, §2, eff. July 1, 2006; Acts 2005, 1st Ex. Sess., No. 13, §1, eff. Nov. 29, 2005]

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