Louisiana Civil Code

Table of Contents (Download PDF)

CHAPTER 5 - PROOF OF OBLIGATIONS

Art. 1831. A party who demands performance of an obligation must prove the existence of the obligation.

A party who asserts that an obligation is null, or that it has been modified or extinguished, must prove the facts or acts giving rise to the nullity, modification, or extinction. [Acts 1984, No. 331, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1985]

Art. 1832. When the law requires a contract to be in written form, the contract may not be proved by testimony or by presumption, unless the written instrument has been destroyed, lost, or stolen. [Acts 1984, No. 331, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1985]

Art. 1833. A. An authentic act is a writing executed before a notary public or other officer authorized to perform that function, in the presence of two witnesses, and signed by each party who executed it, by each witness, and by each notary public before whom it was executed. The typed or hand-printed name of each person shall be placed in a legible form immediately beneath the signature of each person signing the act.

B. To be an authentic act, the writing need not be executed at one time or place, or before the same notary public or in the presence of the same witnesses, provided that each party who executes it does so before a notary public or other officer authorized to perform that function, and in the presence of two witnesses and each party, each witness, and each notary public signs it. The failure to include the typed or hand-printed name of each person signing the act shall not affect the validity or authenticity of the act.

C. If a party is unable or does not know how to sign his name, the notary public must cause him to affix his mark to the writing. [Acts 1984, No. 331, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1985; Acts 2003, No. 965, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 2005]

Art. 1834. An act that fails to be authentic because of the lack of competence or capacity of the notary public, or because of a defect of form, may still be valid as an act under private signature. [Acts 1984, No. 331, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1985]

Art. 1835. An authentic act constitutes full proof of the agreement it contains, as against the parties, their heirs, and successors by universal or particular title. [Acts 1984, No. 331, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1985]

Art. 1836. An act under private signature is regarded prima facie as the true and genuine act of a party executing it when his signature has been acknowledged, and the act shall be admitted in evidence without further proof.

An act under private signature may be acknowledged by a party to that act by recognizing the signature as his own before a court, or before a notary public, or other officer authorized to perform that function, in the presence of two witnesses. An act under private signature may be acknowledged also in any other manner authorized by law.

Nevertheless, an act under private signature, though acknowledged, cannot substitute for an authentic act when the law prescribes such an act. [Acts 1984, No. 331, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1985]

Art. 1837. An act under private signature need not be written by the parties, but must be signed by them. [Acts 1984, No. 331, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1985]

Art. 1838. A party against whom an act under private signature is asserted must acknowledge his signature or deny that it is his.

In case of denial, any means of proof may be used to establish that the signature belongs to that party. [Acts 1984, No. 331, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1985]

Art. 1839. A transfer of immovable property must be made by authentic act or by act under private signature. Nevertheless, an oral transfer is valid between the parties when the property has been actually delivered and the transferor recognizes the transfer when interrogated on oath.

An instrument involving immovable property shall have effect against third persons only from the time it is filed for registry in the parish where the property is located. [Acts 1984, No. 331, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1985]

Art. 1840. When certified by the notary public or other officer before whom the act was passed, a copy of an authentic act constitutes proof of the contents of the original, unless the copy is proved to be incorrect. [Acts 1984, No. 331, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1985]

Art. 1841. When an authentic act or an acknowledged act under private signature has been filed for registry with a public officer, a copy of the act thus filed, when certified by that officer, constitutes proof of the contents of the original. [Acts 1984, No. 331, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1985]

Art. 1842. Confirmation is a declaration whereby a person cures the relative nullity of an obligation.

An express act of confirmation must contain or identify the substance of the obligation and evidence the intention to cure its relative nullity.

Tacit confirmation may result from voluntary performance of the obligation. [Acts 1984, No. 331, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1985]

Art. 1843. Ratification is a declaration whereby a person gives his consent to an obligation incurred on his behalf by another without authority.

An express act of ratification must evidence the intention to be bound by the ratified obligation.

Tacit ratification results when a person, with knowledge of an obligation incurred on his behalf by another, accepts the benefit of that obligation. [Acts 1984, No. 331, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1985]

Art. 1844. The effects of confirmation and ratification are retroactive to the date of the confirmed or ratified obligation. Neither confirmation nor ratification may impair the rights of third persons. [Acts 1984, No. 331, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1985]

Art. 1845. A donation inter vivos that is null for lack of proper form may be confirmed by the donor but the confirmation must be made in the form required for a donation.

The universal successor of the donor may, after his death, expressly or tacitly confirm such a donation. [Acts 1984, No. 331, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1985]

Art. 1846. When a writing is not required by law, a contract not reduced to writing, for a price or, in the absence of a price, for a value not in excess of five hundred dollars may be proved by competent evidence.

If the price or value is in excess of five hundred dollars, the contract must be proved by at least one witness and other corroborating circumstances. [Acts 1984, No. 331, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1985]

Art. 1847. Parol evidence is inadmissible to establish either a promise to pay the debt of a third person or a promise to pay a debt extinguished by prescription. [Acts 1984, No. 331, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1985]

Art. 1848. Testimonial or other evidence may not be admitted to negate or vary the contents of an authentic act or an act under private signature. Nevertheless, in the interest of justice, that evidence may be admitted to prove such circumstances as a vice of consent or to prove that the written act was modified by a subsequent and valid oral agreement. [Acts 1984, No. 331, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1985; Acts 2012, No. 277, §1, eff. Aug. 1, 2012]

Art. 1849. In all cases, testimonial or other evidence may be admitted to prove the existence or a presumption of a simulation or to rebut such a presumption. Nevertheless, between the parties, a counterletter is required to prove that an act purporting to transfer immovable property is an absolute simulation, except when a simulation is presumed or as necessary to protect the rights of forced heirs. [Added by Acts 2012, No. 277, §1, eff. Aug. 1, 2012]

Arts. 1850-1852. [Repealed. Acts 1997, No. 577, §3]

Art. 1853. A judicial confession is a declaration made by a party in a judicial proceeding. That confession constitutes full proof against the party who made it.

A judicial confession is indivisible and it may be revoked only on the ground of error of fact. [Acts 1984, No. 331, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1985]

CHAPITRE 5 – DE LA PREUVE DES OBLIGATIONS

Art. 1831. La partie qui demande l’exécution d’une obligation doit en prouver l’existence.

La partie qui affirme qu’une obligation est nulle, ou qu’elle a été modifiée ou éteinte, doit prouver les faits ou actes à l’origine de la nullité, de la modification ou de l’extinction. [Loi de 1984, n° 331, §1, en vigueur le 1er janv. 1985]

Art. 1832. Lorsque la loi requiert qu’un contrat soit passé par écrit, il ne peut être prouvé par témoignage ou présomption, à moins que l’acte écrit n’ait été détruit, perdu ou volé. [Loi de 1984, n° 331, §1, en vigueur le 1er janv. 1985]

Art. 1833. A.     L’acte authentique est un écrit exécuté par devant un notaire public*, ou par tout autre officier public autorisé à exercer cette fonction, en présence de deux témoins, et signé par chacune des parties qui l’a passé, par chacun des témoins, et par chacun des notaires publics devant lequel il a été passé. Le nom, manuscrit ou dactylographié, de chacun doit être écrit lisiblement immédiatement en dessous de la signature de chacun des signataires de l’acte.

B.  Pour que l’acte soit authentique, l’écrit n’a pas à être passé en un lieu ou en un moment unique, ou devant le même notaire public, ou en présence des mêmes témoins, du moment que chacune des parties s’exécute devant le notaire public ou l’officier public autorisé à exercer cette fonction, en présence de deux témoins, et que chaque partie, chaque témoin et chaque notaire public signe l’acte. L’absence de la mention manuscrite ou dactylographiée du nom de chacun des signataires n’affecte en rien la validité ni l’authenticité de l’acte.

C.  Lorsque l’une des parties n’est pas capable de signer son nom ou ne sait pas comment le faire, le notaire doit l’amener à apposer sa marque sur l’écrit. [Loi de 1984, n° 331, §1, en vigueur le 1er janv. 1985]

* NdT : Comme dans les autres états et dans les pays de common law, le notary public n’est pas un officier ministériel investi du sceau de l’état. Bien souvent, il n’a pas de formation juridique et sa fonction se limite à la certification des actes qui lui sont présentés par les parties.

Art. 1834. L’acte qui ne peut être considéré comme authentique en raison de l’incompétence ou de l’incapacité du notaire public, ou en raison d’un vice de forme, peut néanmoins être valide en tant qu’acte sous seing privé. [Loi de 1984, n° 331, §1, en vigueur le 1er janv. 1985]

Art. 1835. L’acte authentique fait pleinement foi de la convention qu’il renferme, entre les parties, leurs héritiers, et leurs successeurs universels ou particulier. [Loi de 1984, n° 331, §1, en vigueur le 1er janv. 1985]

Art. 1836. L’acte sous seing privé est présumé être l’acte véritable et sincère de la partie qui le passe lorsque sa signature a fait l’objet d’une reconnaissance. Dans ce cas, la valeur probatoire de l’acte doit être admise sans qu’il soit nécessaire d’apporter d’autre preuve.

L’acte sous seing privé peut faire l’objet d’une reconnaissance par une partie à cet acte en reconnaissant la signature comme étant la sienne devant un juge, ou devant un notaire public ou tout officier public autorisé à exercer cette fonction, en présence de deux témoins. L’acte sous seing privé peut aussi faire l’objet d’une reconnaissance de toute autre manière autorisée par la loi.

Cependant, l’acte sous seing privé, bien que reconnu, ne peut être substitué à un acte authentique lorsque la loi prescrit un tel acte. [Loi de 1984, n° 331, §1, en vigueur le 1er janv. 1985]

Art. 1837. L’acte sous seing privé peut ne pas être rédigé par les parties, mais elles doivent le signer. [Loi de 1984, n° 331, §1, en vigueur le 1er janv. 1985]

Art. 1838. La partie à qui l’on oppose un acte sous seing privé doit reconnaître sa signature ou la nier.

En cas de dénégation, il peut être établi par tout moyen que cette signature est la sienne. [Loi de 1984, n° 331, §1, en vigueur le 1er janv. 1985]

Art. 1839. Le transfert de propriété d’un bien immobilier doit être établi par acte authentique ou par acte sous seing privé. Cependant, le transfert oral est valable entre les parties lorsque le bien a été effectivement délivré et que le cédant reconnaît le transfert lorsqu’il est interrogé sous serment.

Un acte relatif à la propriété immobilière n’est opposable aux tiers qu’à compter du moment de son enregistrement dans la paroisse* où l’immeuble se situe. [Loi de 1984, n° 331, §1, en vigueur le 1er janv. 1985]

* NdT : La Louisiane a conservé la paroisse comme division territoriale. Celle-ci est l’équivalent du comté dans les autres états.

Art. 1840. Lorsqu’elle est certifiée par le notaire public ou l’officier public devant lequel l’acte a été passé, une copie d’un acte authentique constitue une preuve du contenu de l’original, sauf preuve de non-conformité de la copie. [Loi de 1984, n° 331, §1, en vigueur le 1er janv. 1985]

Art. 1841. Lorsqu’un acte authentique ou un acte sous seing privé reconnu a été enregistré au registre par un officier public, une copie de l’acte enregistré, lorsqu’elle est certifiée par ce dernier, vaut preuve du contenu de l’original. [Loi de 1984, n° 331, §1, en vigueur le 1er janv. 1985]

Art. 1842. La confirmation est la déclaration par laquelle une personne remédie à la nullité relative d’une obligation.

Un acte exprès de confirmation doit contenir ou identifier la substance de l’obligation et apporter la preuve de l’intention de remédier à sa nullité relative.

Une confirmation tacite peut résulter de l’exécution volontaire de l’obligation. [Loi de 1984, n° 331, §1, en vigueur le 1er janv. 1985]

Art. 1843. La ratification est une déclaration par laquelle une personne donne son consentement à une obligation contractée par une autre personne en son nom, sans avoir reçu pouvoir de le faire.

L’acte exprès de ratification doit manifester l’intention d’être lié par l’obligation ratifiée.

Il y a ratification tacite lorsqu’une personne ayant connaissance d’une obligation contractée en son nom, en accepte le bénéfice. [Loi de 1984, n° 331, §1, en vigueur le 1er janv. 1985]

Art. 1844.Les effets de la confirmation et de la ratification rétroagissent à la date de l’obligation confirmée ou ratifiée. Ni la confirmation, ni la ratification ne peuvent porter atteinte aux droits des tiers. [Loi de 1984, n° 331, §1, en vigueur le 1er janv. 1985]

Art. 1845. Une donation entre vifs nulle pour vice de forme peut être confirmée par le donateur, mais la confirmation doit être effectuée dans la forme requise pour une donation.

Le successeur universel du donateur peut, après le décès de celui-ci, confirmer expressément ou tacitement une telle donation. [Loi de 1984, n° 331, §1, en vigueur le 1er janv. 1985]

Art. 1846. Lorsque la forme écrite n’est pas requise par la loi, un contrat non passé par écrit dont le prix ou, en l’absence de prix, la valeur n’excède pas cinq cents dollars, peut être prouvé par tout moyen.

Si le prix ou la valeur excède cinq cents dollars, le contrat doit être prouvé par au moins un témoin et d’autres circonstances concordantes. [Loi de 1984, n° 331, §1, en vigueur le 1er janv. 1985]

Art. 1847. La preuve orale ne peut être admise pour établir une promesse de paiement de la dette d’un tiers, ou une promesse de paiement d’une dette éteinte par prescription. [Loi de 1984, n° 331, §1, en vigueur le 1er janv. 1985]                                                                                   

Art. 1848. La preuve par témoin ou par autre moyen ne peut être admise pour nier ou pour modifier le contenu d’un acte authentique ou d’un acte sous seing privé. Toutefois, dans l’intérêt de la justice, cette preuve peut être admise pour établir des circonstances telles que le vice du consentement ou afin de prouver que l’acte écrit a été modifié par un accord oral valable et ultérieur. [Loi de 1984, n° 331, §1, en vigueur le 1er janv. 1985 ; loi de 2012, n° 277, §1, en vigueur le 1er août 2012]

Art. 1849. Dans tous les cas, la preuve par témoin ou par autre moyen peut être admise pour prouver l’existence d’une simulation, en établir la présomption ou renverser une telle présomption. Toutefois, entre les parties, une contre-lettre est requise afin de prouver qu’un acte translatif de propriété immobilière est une simulation absolue, sauf lorsque la simulation est présumée ou lorsqu’il est nécessaire de protéger les droits des héritiers réservataires. [Ajouté par la loi de 2012, n° 277, §1, en vigueur le 1er août 2012]

Art. 1850 à 1852. [Abrogés par la loi de 1997, n° 577, §3]

Art. 1853. L’aveu judiciaire est la déclaration faite par une partie lors d’une instance judiciaire. Cet aveu fait pleinement foi à l’encontre de son auteur.

L’aveu judiciaire est indivisible et n’est révocable que pour erreur de fait. [Loi de 1984, n° 331, §1, en vigueur le 1er janv. 1985]