Louisiana Civil Code

Table of Contents (Download PDF)

SECTION 3 - HOW COLLATIONS ARE MADE

Art. 1251. Collations are made in kind or by taking less.

Art. 1252. The collation is made in kind, when the thing which has been given, is delivered up by the donee to be united to the mass of the succession.

Art. 1253. The collation is made by taking less, when the donee diminishes the portion he inherits, in proportion to the value of the object he has received, and takes so much less from the surplus of the effects as is explained in the chapter which treats of partitions.

Art. 1254. In the execution of the collation it must first be considered whether the things subject to it are movables or immovables.

Art. 1255. If an immovable has been given, and the donee hath it in his possession at the time of the partition, he has the choice to make the collation in kind or by taking less, unless the donor has imposed on him the condition of making the collation in kind, in which case it can not be made in any other manner than that prescribed by the donor, unless it be with the consent of the other heirs who must be all of age, present or represented in this State.

Art. 1256. The donee who collates in kind an immovable, which has been given to him, must be reimbursed by his coheirs for the expenses which have improved the estate, in proportion to the increase of value which it has received thereby.

Art. 1257. The coheirs are bound to allow to the donee the necessary expenses which he has incurred for the preservation of the estate, though they may not have augmented its value.

Art. 1258. As to works made on the estate for the mere pleasure of the donee, no reimbursement is due to him for them; he has, however, the right to take them away, if he can do it without injuring the estate, and leave things in the same situation they were at the time of the donation.

Art. 1259. Expenses made on immovable property are distinguished by three kinds: necessary, useful, and those for mere pleasure.

Necessary expenses are those which are indispensable to the preservation of the thing.

Useful expenses are those which increase the value of the immovable property, but without which the estate can be preserved.

Expenses for mere pleasure are those which are only made for the accommodation or convenience of the owner or possessor of the estate, and which do not increase its value.

Art. 1260. The donee, who collates in kind the immovable property given to him, is accountable for the deteriorations and damage which have diminished its value, when caused by his fault or negligence.

Art. 1261. If within the time and in the form prescribed in the chapter which treats of partitions, the donee has made his election to collate in kind the immovable property which has been given to him, and it is afterwards destroyed, without the act or fault of the donee, the loss is borne by the succession, and the donee shall not be bound to collate the value of the property.

Art. 1262. If the immovable property be only destroyed in part, it shall be collated in the state in which it is.

Art. 1263. But if the immovable property is destroyed after the donee has declared that he wishes to collate by taking less, the loss is his, and he is bound to take less from the succession, in the same manner as if the property had not been destroyed.

Art. 1264. When the collation is made in kind, the effects are united to the mass of the succession as they may be burdened with real rights created by operation of law or by onerous title. In such a case, the donee is accountable for the resulting diminution of the value of the immovable. [Amended by Acts 1981, No. 739, §1]

Art. 1265. In the case mentioned in the preceding article, if the property mortgaged, which has been collated in kind, falls by the partition to the donee, the mortgage continues to exist thereon as if it had never been collated; but if the donee receives for his portion other movables or immovables of the succession, the creditor shall have a privilege for the amount of his mortgage on the property which has thus fallen to his debtor by the partition.

Art. 1266. When the gift of immovable property, made to a lawful child or descendant, exceeds the portion which the ascendant could legally dispose of, the donee may make the collation of this excess in kind, if such excess can be separated conveniently.

Art. 1267. If, on the contrary, the retrenchment of the excess over and above the disposable portion can not conveniently be made, the donee is bound to collate the excess by taking less, as is hereafter prescribed for the cases in which the collation is made of immovable property given him otherwise than as advantage or extra portion.

Art. 1268. The donee, who makes the collation in kind of the immovable property given to him, may keep possession of the same until the final reimbursement of the sums to him due for the necessary and useful expenses which he has made thereon, after deducting the amount of the damage the estate has suffered through his fault or neglect, as is before provided.

Art. 1269. When the donee has elected to collate the immovable property given him by taking less on the part which comes to him from the succession, the collation must be made according to the value which the immovable property had at the opening of the succession, a deduction being made for the expenses incurred thereon, in conformity with what has been heretofore prescribed.

Art. 1270. If the donee has voluntarily alienated the immovable property which has been given him, or if he has permitted it to be seized and sold for the payment of his debts, or if it has been destroyed by his fault or negligence, he shall not be the less bound to make the collation of it, according to the value which the immovable would have had at the time of the opening of the succession, deducting expenses, as is provided in the foregoing Article. [Amended by Acts 1981, No. 739, §1]

Art. 1271. But if the donee has been forced to alienate the immovable property, he shall be obliged to collate by taking less the price he has received from this sale and no more.

As, for example, if the donee shall be obliged to submit to a sale of the immovable for some object of public utility, or to discharge a mortgage imposed by the donor, or because the immovable was held in common with another person who has prayed for the sale in order to obtain a partition of it.

Art. 1272. If the immovable property which has been given has been sold by the donee, and afterwards is destroyed by accident in the possession of the purchaser, the donee shall only be obliged to collate by taking less the price he received for the sale.

Art. 1273. When the collation is made by taking less, the coheirs to whom the collation is due have a right to require a sale of the property remaining to the succession, in order to be paid from the proceeds of this sale, not only the collation which is due to them, but the part which comes to them from the surplus of these proceeds, unless they prefer to pay themselves the amount of the collation due to them by taking such movables and immovables of the succession as they may choose, according to the appraisement in the inventory, or the appraisement which serves as a basis to the partition.

Art. 1274. If the coheirs to whom the collation is made by taking less, wish that the effects of the succession be sold, in order that they may be paid what is due them, they are bound to decide thereon in three days from their being notified of the motion of the donee to that effect, before the judge of the partition, otherwise they shall be deprived of this right, and shall be considered as having consented to receive payment of the collation due them in effects and property of the succession, or otherwise from the hands of the donee.

Art. 1275. When the coheirs, thus notified, require the sale of the effects of the succession to pay themselves the collation due them, the sale shall be made at public auction, in the same manner as when it is necessary to sell property held in common, in order to effect a partition.

Art. 1276. If, on the contrary, the coheirs to whom the collation is due prefer to be paid the amount thereof in property and effects of the succession, or are divested of their right to require the sale of these effects, they shall be paid the amount of the collation in movables, immovables and other effects of the succession, in the same manner as is prescribed in the chapter which treats of partitions.

But in no case will these heirs be obliged to receive in payment credits of the succession.

Art. 1277. If there are no effects in the succession, or not sufficient to satisfy the heirs to whom the collation is due, the amount of the collation, or the balance due on it, shall be paid them by the heir who owes the collation.

Art. 1278. This heir shall have one year to pay the sum thus by him due, if he furnish his coheirs with his obligation payable at that time, with eight per cent. interest, and give a special mortgage to secure the payment thereof, either on the immovable property subject to the collation, if it is in his possession, or in want thereof, on some other immovable property which may suit the coheirs.

Art. 1279. If the heir, who has been allowed to furnish his obligation as mentioned in the preceding article, fails to fulfill his engagement at the expiration of the year granted to him, the heirs, in whose favor this obligation has been made, or their representatives, have a right to cause the property mortgaged to them to be seized and sold, without any appraisement, and at the price offered at the first exposure for sale.

Art. 1280. If the property thus seized and sold is the same which was subject to the collation, the coheirs seizing, or their representatives, shall be paid the amount of their debt due for the collation, by privilege and in preference to all the creditors of the donee, even to those to whom he may have mortgaged the property for his own debts or engagements, previous to the opening of the succession, saving to these mortgage creditors their recourse against other property of the donee.

Art. 1281. A. If the donee who owes the collation has alienated by onerous title the immovable given to him, the coheirs shall not have the right to claim the immovable in the hands of the transferee.

B. If the donee who owes the collation has created a real right by onerous title in the immovable given to him or such right has been created by operation of law since the donee received the immovable, the coheirs may claim the immovable in the hands of the donee but subject to such real right as has been created. In such a case, the donee and his successors by gratuitous title are accountable for the resulting diminution of the value of the property. [Amended by Acts 1981, No. 739, §1. Acts 1984, No. 869, §1]

Art. 1282. The third purchaser or possessor of the real estate subject to collation may avoid the effect of the action of revendication, by paying to the coheirs of the donee, to whom the collation is due, to wit: the excess of the value of the property above the disposable portion, if the donation has been made as an advantage or extra portion, or the whole of the value thereof, if the donation has been made without this provision, by fulfilling in this respect all the obligations by which the donee himself was bound towards the coheirs.

Art. 1283. When movables have been given, the donee is not permitted to collate them in kind; he is bound to collate for them by taking less, according to their appraised value at the time of the donation, if there be any annexed to the donation. In default thereof, recourse may be had to other evidence to establish the value of these movables at the time of the donation.

Art. 1284. Therefore the donation of movables contains an absolute transfer of the rights of the donor to the donee in the movables thus given.

Art. 1285. The collation of money may be made in money or by taking less, at the choice of the donee who is bound to decide thereon, in the same manner as is prescribed for the collation of immovable property.

Art. 1286. If it be movables or money, of which the donee wishes to make the collation by taking less, he has the right of compelling his coheirs to pay themselves the collation due to them in money, and not otherwise, if there be sufficient in the succession to make these payments with.

Art. 1287. But if there is not sufficient money in the succession to pay such heirs the collation due to them, they shall pay themselves by taking an equivalent in the other movables or immovables of the succession, as is directed with respect to the collation of immovable property.

Art. 1288. In case there be no property or effects in the succession to satisfy the collations due for movables or money given, the donee shall have, for the payment of the sum due to his coheirs, the same terms of payment as are given for the payment of the amount of collations of immovable property, and under the same conditions as are before prescribed.

SECTION 3 - DE LA MANIÈRE DONT SONT OPÉRÉS LES RAPPORTS

Art. 1251. Les rapports se font en nature ou en moins prenant. → CC, 1825 art. 1329

Art. 1252. Le rapport se fait en nature, lorsque la chose même qui avait été donnée, est remise par le donataire, pour être réunie à la masse de la succession. → CC 1825, art. 1330

Art. 1253. Le rapport se fait en moins prenant, lorsque le donataire diminue sur sa portion héréditaire la valeur de l'objet qu'il a reçu, et prend d'autant moins dans le surplus des biens ainsi qu'il est expliqué dans la section qui traite du partage. → CC 1825, art. 1331

Art. 1254. Pour exécuter l'obligation de rapport, il faut distinguer si les choses qui y sont sujettes, sont des meubles ou des immeubles. → CC 1825, art. 1332

Art. 1255. Si c'est un immeuble qui a été donné, et que le donataire l'ait en sa possession, lors du partage, il a le choix de le rapporter en nature ou en moins prenant, si ce n'est que le donateur lui eût imposé la condition de faire ce rapport en nature, dans lequel cas le rapport ne pourra pas se faire autrement qu'il n'a été prescrit par le donateur, si ce n'est du consentement des autres héritiers qui seraient tous majeurs, présents ou représentés dans cet état. → CC 1825, art. 1333

Art. 1256. Le donataire qui fait le rapport en nature de l’immeuble à lui donné, doit être remboursé par ses cohéritiers des impenses qui ont amélioré ce bien, en proportion de l'augmentation de valeur qu'il a reçue. → CC 1825, art. 1334

Art. 1257. Il doit être également tenu compte au donataire des impenses nécessaires qu'il a faites pour la conservation de ce bien-fonds, encore qu'elles n'en aient point augmenté la valeur. → CC 1825, art. 1335

Art. 1258. Quant aux impenses de pur agrément faites sur ce bien-fonds, il n'en est tenu aucun compte au donataire qui a droit seulement de les enlever, s'il peut le faire sans détériorer, et en rétablissant les choses dans l'état où elles étaient au moment de la donation. → CC 1825, art. 1336

Art. 1259. On distingue les impenses qu'on peut faire sur un bien immeuble, en trois espèces : les nécessaires, les utiles et celles de pur agrément.

Les impenses nécessaires sont celles qui sont indispensables pour ne pas laisser dépérir le bien ;

Les impenses utiles sont celles qui augmentent la valeur du bien immeuble, et sans lesquelles néanmoins, il ne dépérirait pas ;

Les impenses de pur agrément sont celles qui ne sont faites que pour la commodité ou la convenance du propriétaire ou du possesseur de l'héritage, et qui n'en augmentent pas la valeur. → CC 1825 art. 1337

Art. 1260. Le donataire qui rapporte en nature le bien immeuble qui lui a été donné, doit de son côté, tenir compte des dégradations et détériorations qui en ont diminué la valeur par sa faute ou sa négligence. → CC 1825, art. 1338

Art. 1261. Si depuis que le donataire a déclaré vouloir rapporter en nature le bien immeuble qui lui a été donné, dans les délais et dans la forme qui sont prescrits dans le chapitre qui traite du partage, ce bien immeuble vient à périr, sans le fait ni la faute du donataire, la perte sera pour la succession, et le donataire sera exempt de rapporter cet héritage ou sa valeur. → CC1825 art. 1339

Art. 1262. Si ce bien immeuble n'a été détruit qu'en partie, ii sera rapporté dans l'état où il se trouve. → CC 1825, art. 1340

Art. 1263. Mais si le bien immeuble vient à périr depuis que le donataire a déclaré qu'il voulait le rapporter en moins prenant, la perte en sera pour son compte, et il sera tenu de moins prendre dans la succession, de la même manière que si le bien n'avait point péri. → CC 1825, art. 1341

Art. 1264. Lorsque le rapport se fait en nature, les biens se réunissent à la masse de la succession car ils peuvent être grevés de droits réels créés par l’opération de la loi ou à titre onéreux. Dans un tel cas, le donataire est responsable de la diminution de la valeur de l'immeuble. [Modifié par la Loi de 1981, n° 739, §1]

Art. 1265. Dans le cas de l'article précédent, si le bien hypothéqué qui est rapporté en nature, tombe en partage au donataire, l'hypothèque continue de subsister sur ce bien, comme s'il n'avait pas été rapporté ; mais si le donataire reçoit pour sa part d'autres biens meubles ou immeubles de la succession, le créancier aura un privilège pour être payé du montant de son hypothèque, sur les biens qui seront ainsi échus en partage à son débiteur. → CC 1825, art. 1343

Art. 1266. Lorsque le don d'un bien immeuble fait à un enfant ou descendant légitime, excède la portion dont l'ascendant a pu disposer d'après la loi, le donataire peut faire le rapport de l'excédent en nature, si le retranchement de cet excédent peut s'opérer commodément. → CC1825 art. 1344

Art. 1267. Si au contraire, le retranchement de l'excédent, au-delà de la portion disponible, ne peut pas s'opérer commodément, le donataire devra rapporter cet excédent, en moins prenant, ainsi qu'il est prescrit ci-après pour les cas où il rapporte de cette manière les biens immeubles qui lui ont été donnés autrement qu'à titre d'avantage ou hors part. → CC 1825, art. 1345

Art. 1268. Le donataire qui fait le rapport en nature du bien immeuble qui lui a été donné, peut en retenir la possession, jusqu'au remboursement effectif des sommes qui lui sont dues pour les impenses nécessaires ou utiles qu'il a pu y faire, après déduction des dégradations ou détériorations que ce bien aurait pu souffrir par sa faute ou sa négligence, ainsi qu'il est dit ci-dessus. → CC 1825, art. 1346

Art. 1269. Lorsque le donataire a déclaré qu'il voulait rapporter le bien immeuble à lui donné, en moins prenant sur la part qui lui revient dans les autres biens de la succession, il devra faire ce rapport en raison de la valeur que ce bien immeuble pouvait avoir au moment de l'ouverture de la succession, déduction faite des impenses qu'il peut y avoir faites, conformément à ce qui est ci-dessus prescrit. → CC 1825, art. 1347

Art. 1270. Si le donataire a aliéné volontairement le bien immeuble qui lui a été donné, ou s'il l'a laissé saisir et vendre sur lui pour le payement de ses dettes personnelles, ou que ce bien ait péri par sa faute ou sa négligence, il n'en sera pas moins tenu d'en faire le rapport en raison de la valeur que ce bien immeuble a ou aurait pu avoir au moment de l'ouverture de la succession, déduction faite des impenses, ainsi qu'il est dit en l'article précédent. [Modifié par la loi de 1981, n° 739, §1] → CC 1825, art. 1348

Art. 1271. Mais si le donataire a été forcé d'aliéner le bien immeuble qui lui a été donné, il ne devra rapporter, en moins prenant, que le prix qu'il aura reçu de cette vente.

Tel serait par exemple, le cas où le donataire aurait été contraint de souffrir la vente de ce bien immeuble pour un objet d'utilité publique, ou pour acquitter les charges d'une hypothèque créée par le donateur, ou parce que cet immeuble se trouverait indivis avec un autre copropriétaire qui en aurait demandé la vente pour en opérer le partage. → CC 1825, art. 1349

Art. 1272. Si le bien immeuble qui a été donné, a été vendu par le donataire, et qu'il vienne ensuite à périr par cas fortuit entre les mains de l'acquéreur, le donataire ne devra rapporter en moins prenant, que le prix qu'il aura reçu de cette vente. → CC 1825, art. 1350

Art. 1273. Lorsque le rapport se fait en moins prenant, les cohéritiers à qui le rapport est dû, ont le droit d'exiger la vente des biens qui restent dans la succession, pour pouvoir être remplis sur le produit de cette vente, non seulement du rapport qui leur est dû, mais encore de la part qui leur reviendra dans le surplus de ce produit, si mieux ils n'aiment se payer du montant du rapport qui leur est dû en prenant jusqu'à due concurrence des biens meubles et immeubles de la succession, à leur choix, suivant la valeur qui leur a été donnée dans l'inventaire ou dans l'acte estimatif qui sert de base au partage. → CC 1825, art. 1351

Art. 1274. Si les cohéritiers à qui le rapport se fait en moins prenant, veulent que les biens de la succession soient vendus, pour être remplis de ce qui leur est dû, ils devront s'en expliquer dans les trois jours de l'interpellation qui leur en sera faite par devant le juge du partage, sur motion du donataire ; autrement ils seront déchus de ce droit, et seront censés consentir à recevoir le payement du rapport qui leur est dû, en biens et effets de la succession ou autrement, des mains du donataire. → CC 1825, art. 1352

Art. 1275. Lorsque les cohéritiers ainsi interpellés, demandent la vente des biens de la succession pour se remplir du rapport qui leur est dû, cette vente se fera à l'enchère publique de la même manière que lorsqu'il est nécessaire de vendre des biens communs pour en opérer le partage en justice. → CC 1825, art. 1353

Art. 1276. Si au contraire, les héritiers à qui le rapport est dû, préfèrent être payés de son montant en biens et effets de la succession, ou s'ils se trouvent déchus du droit de demander la vente de ces biens, ainsi qu’il est dit en l’article précèdent*, ils seront remplis du montant de ce rapport en biens meubles et immeubles ou autres effets de la succession, de la manière qui est prescrite dans le chapitre qui traite du partage.

Mais dans aucun cas, ces héritiers ne seront tenus d'accepter en payement des créances de la succession, qui ne leur conviendraient pas. → CC 1825, art. 1354

* NdT : Inchangé ; membre de phrase omis dans la version anglaise reprise de 1825.

Art. 1277. S'il n'y a pas de biens dans la succession, ou s'il n'y en a pas de suffisants pour remplir les héritiers à qui le rapport est dû, le montant de ce rapport, ou la balance qui en restera due, devra leur être payée par l'héritier qui doit le rapport. → CC 1825, art. 1355

Art. 1278. Cet héritier aura un an pour payer la somme par lui ainsi due, s'il fournit à ses cohéritiers son obligation payable à ce terme, en y ajoutant huit pour cent d'intérêt, et s'il leur donne pour en assurer le payement, une hypothèque spéciale, soit sur le bien immeuble qui était sujet au rapport, s'il est en sa possession, soit à son défaut, sur tout autre bien immeuble qui pourrait convenir à ses cohéritiers. → CC 1825, art. 1356

Art. 1279. Si l'héritier qui a été admis à fournir son obligation, ainsi qu'il est mentionné dans l'article précédent, manque à remplir son engagement à l'expiration de l'année qui lui a été accordée, les héritiers en faveur desquels cette obligation a été souscrite, ou leurs ayant cause, auront le droit de faire saisir et vendre le bien qui leur a été hypothéqué, sans aucune estimation préalable, et pour le prix qui en sera offert, dès la première criée qui en sera faite. → CC 1825, art. 1357

Art. 1280. Si le bien qui est ainsi saisi et vendu, est le même qui était sujet au rapport, les cohéritiers saisissant, ou leurs ayant cause, seront payés du montant de leurs créances par privilège et préférence à tous créanciers du donataire, même à ceux à qui il aurait hypothéqué ce bien pour ses dettes ou engagements particuliers, antérieurement à l'ouverture de la succession, sauf le recours de ces créanciers hypothécaires contre les autres biens du donataire. → CC 1825, art. 1358

Art. 1281. A. Si le donataire qui doit le rapport, a aliéné à titre onéreux l’immeuble qui lui a été donné, les cohéritiers n'auront pas le droit de revendiquer l'immeuble ainsi vendu dans les mains du cessionnaire.

B. Si le donataire qui doit le rapport, a créé un droit réel à titre onéreux sur l’immeuble qui lui a été donné ou qu'un tel droit a été créé par l'opération de la loi depuis que le donataire a reçu cet immeuble, les cohéritiers peuvent le revendiquer dans les mains du donataire mais sous réserve du droit réel ainsi créé. Dans un tel cas, le donataire et ses successeurs à titre gratuit sont responsables de la diminution de la valeur du bien qui en résulte. [Modifié par la loi de 1981, n° 739, §1 ; loi de 1984, n° 869, §1]

Art. 1282. Le tiers acquéreur ou détenteur du bien-fonds sujet au rapport, pourra éviter l'effet de l'action de revendication, en payant aux cohéritiers du donataire, auxquels le rapport est dû, savoir : l'excédent de la valeur que ce bien peut avoir au-delà de la part disponible, si la donation a été faite à titre d'avantage ou hors part, ou la totalité de cette valeur si la donation a été faite sans cette clause, en remplissant à cet égard toutes les obligations auxquelles le donataire était tenu lui-même envers ses cohéritiers. → CC 1825, art. 1360

Art. 1283. Lorsque ce sont des biens meubles qui ont été donnés, le donataire ne sera point admis à les rapporter en nature ; et il sera tenu d'en faire le rapport en moins prenant, d'après leur valeur estimée au moment de la donation, s'il y en a un d’annexé à la donation. À défaut, on peut avoir recours aux preuves servant à constater la valeur que ces biens meubles avaient lors de la donation. → CC 1825, art. 1361, 1363

Art. 1284. En conséquence, la donation des biens meubles contient une transmission absolue des droits du donateur en faveur du donataire, sur les biens meubles ainsi donnés. → CC 1825, art. 1362

Art. 1285. Le rapport de l'argent donné peut se faire en espèces ou en moins prenant, au choix du donataire qui sera tenu de s'expliquer sur ce choix, de la même manière qu'il est prescrit pour le rapport des biens immeubles. → CC 1825, art. 1364

Art. 1286. Si ce sont des meubles ou de l'argent, dont le donataire veuille faire le rapport en moins prenant, il aura le droit de contraindre ses cohéritiers à se remplir du rapport qui leur est dû, en espèces, et non autrement, s'il en est trouvé suffisamment dans la succession pour pouvoir effectuer ce payement. → CC 1825, art. 1365

Art. 1287. Mais s'il ne trouve pas d'espèces en suffisante quantité pour remplir les cohéritiers du rapport qui leur est dû, ils pourront se payer en prenant une valeur égale dans les autres biens meubles et immeubles de la succession ainsi qu'il a été prescrit relativement aux biens immeubles. → CC 1825, art. 1366

Art. 1288. Dans le cas où il ne se trouverait pas de biens ou d'effets dans la succession pour remplir le rapport qui est dû pour des biens meubles ou de l'argent donné, le donataire aura, pour payer la somme qu'il devra à ses cohéritiers à cet égard, les mêmes délais qui sont accordés pour le payement du montant du rapport des biens immeubles, et sous les mêmes conditions qui ont été ci-dessus prescrites. → CC 1825, art. 1367