Louisiana Civil Code

Table of Contents (Download PDF)

CHAPTER 9 - OF THE SUCCESSIONS OF PERSONS DOMICILIATED OUT OF THE STATE, AND OF THE TAX DUE BY FOREIGN HEIRS, LEGATEES AND DONEES

 

SECTION 1 - OF THE SUCCESSIONS OF PERSONS DOMICILIATED OUT OF THE STATE

Art. 1220. [Repealed. Acts 1960, No. 30, §2, eff. Jan. 1, 1961]

 

SECTION 2 - OF THE TAX DUE BY FOREIGN HEIRS, LEGATEES AND DONEES

Arts. 1221-1223. [Repealed. Acts 1960, No. 30, §2, eff. Jan. 1, 1961]

 

CHAPTER 10 - OF SUCCESSIONS ADMINISTERED BY SYNDICS

Arts. 1224-1226. [Repealed by Acts 1960, No. 30, §2, eff. Jan. 1, 1961]

 

CHAPTER 11 - OF COLLATIONS

 

SECTION 1 - WHAT COLLATION IS, AND BY WHOM IT IS DUE

Art. 1227. The collation of goods is the supposed or real return to the mass of the succession which an heir makes of property which he received in advance of his share or otherwise, in order that such property may be divided together with the other effects of the succession.

Art. 1228. A. Children or grandchildren, coming to the succession of their fathers, mothers, or other ascendants, must collate what they have received from them by donation inter vivos, directly or indirectly, and they cannot claim the legacies made to them by such ascendants unless the donations and legacies have been made to them expressly as an advantage over their coheirs and besides their portion.

B. This rule takes place whether the children or their descendants succeed to their ascendants as legal or as testamentary heirs. [Acts 2001, No. 572, §1]

Art. 1229. The obligation of collating is founded on the equality which must be naturally observed between children and other lawful descendants, who divide among them the succession of their father, mother and other ascendants; and also on the presumption that what was given or bequeathed to children by their ascendants was so disposed of in advance of what they might one day expect from their succession.

Art. 1230. Collation must take place, whether the donor has formerly [formally] ordered it, or has remained silent on the subject; for collation is always presumed, where it has not been expressly forbidden.

Art. 1231. But things given or bequeathed to children or other descendants by their ascendants, shall not be collated, if the donor has formally expressed his will that what he thus gave was an advantage or extra part, unless the value of the object given exceed the disposable portion, in which case the excess is subject to collation.

Art. 1232. The declaration that the gift or legacy is made as an advantage or extra portion may be made in the instrument where such disposition is contained, or afterwards by an act passed before a notary and two witnesses, or in the donor's last will and testament. Unless expressly stated to the contrary, a declaration of dispensation from collation made in the last will and testament of the donor shall be effective as a dispensation from collating donations made both before and after execution of said testament. [Acts 1986, No. 246, §1]

Art. 1233. The declaration that the gift or legacy is intended as an advantage or extra portion, may be made in other equivalent terms, provided they indicate, in an unequivocal manner, that such was the will of the donor.

Art. 1234. If, upon calculation of the value of advantages thus given, and of the other effects remaining in the succession, such remaining part should prove insufficient to give to the other children their legitimate portion, the donee would then be obliged to collate the sum by him received, as far as necessary to complete such portion, though he would wish to keep the donation, and renounce the inheritance; and in this calculation of the legitimate portion, the property given or bequeathed by the ascendants, not only to their children, but even to all other persons, whether relations or strangers, must be included.

Art. 1235. The right to demand collation is confined to descendants of the first degree who qualify as forced heirs, and only applies with respect to gifts made within the three years prior to the decedent's death, and valued as of the date of the gift. Any provision of the Civil Code to the contrary is hereby repealed. [Acts 1996, 1st Ex. Sess., No. 77, §1]

Art. 1236. [Repealed. Acts 1990, No. 147, §3, eff. July 1, 1990]

Art. 1237. If children, or other lawful descendants holding property or legacies subject to be collated, should renounce the succession of the ascendant, from whom they have received such property, they may retain the gift, or claim the legacy to them made, without being subject to any collation.

If, however, the remaining amount of the inheritance should not be sufficient for the legitimate portion of the other children, including in the succession of the deceased the property which the person renouncing would have collated, had he become heir, he shall then be obliged to collate up to the sum necessary to complete such legitimate portion.

Art. 1238. A. To make descendants liable to collation, as prescribed in the preceding Articles, they must appear in the quality of heirs to the succession of the ascendants from whom they immediately have received the gift or legacy.

B. Therefore, grandchildren, to whom a gift was made or a legacy left by their grandfather or grandmother, after the death of their father or mother, are obliged to collate, when they are called to the inheritance of the grandfather or grandmother, jointly with the other grandchildren, or by representation with their uncles or aunts, brothers or sisters of their father or mother, because it is presumed that their grandfather or grandmother had intended to make the gift, or leave the legacy by anticipation. [Acts 1990, No. 147, §1, eff. July 1, 1990; Acts 1995, No. 1180, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1996]

Art. 1239. A. But gifts made or legacies left to a grandchild by his grandfather or grandmother during the life of his father, are always reputed to be exempt from collation.

B. The father, inheriting from the grandfather, is not liable to collate the gifts or legacies left to his child. [Acts 1990, No. 147, §1, eff. July 1, 1990; Acts 1995, No. 1180, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1996]

Art. 1240. In like manner, the grandchild, when inheriting in his own right from the grandfather or grandmother, is not obliged to refund the gifts made to his father, even though he should have accepted the succession; but if the grandchild comes in only by right of representation, he must collate what had been given to his father, even though he should have renounced his inheritance.

Art. 1241. What has been said in the three preceding articles, of grandchildren inheriting from their grandfather or grandmother, must be understood of the great-grandchildren and other lawful descendants called to inherit from their ascendants, either in their own name or by right of representation.

CHAPITRE 9 - DES SUCCESSIONS DE PERSONNES DOMICILIÉES HORS DE L'ÉTAT, ET DES TAXES DUES PAR LES HÉRITIERS, LÉGATAIRES ET DONATAIRES ÉTRANGERS [Abrogé]

SECTION 1 - DES SUCCESSIONS DE PERSONNES DOMICILIÉES HORS DE L'ÉTAT [Abrogée]

Art. 1220. [Abrogé par la loi de 1960, n° 30, §2, en vigueur le 1er janvier 1961]

SECTION 2 - DES TAXES DUE PAR LES HÉRITIERS, LÉGATAIRES ET DONATAIRES ÉTRANGERS [Abrogée]

Arts.  1221 à 1223. [Abrogés par la loi de 1960, n° 30, §2, en vigueur le 1er janvier 1961]

 

CHAPITRE 10 - DES SUCCESSIONS ADMINISTRÉES PAR UN SYNDIC [Abrogé]

Arts.  1224 à 1226. [Abrogés par la loi de 1960, n˚ 30, §2, en vigueur le 1er janvier 1961]

 

CHAPITRE 11 - DES RAPPORTS

SECTION 1 - DE CE QUE SONT LES RAPPORTS ET PAR QUI ILS SONT DUS

Art. 1227. On entend par rapport, la remise fictive ou réelle qu'un héritier fait à la masse, de quelque effet qu'il a reçu en avancement d'hoirie ou autrement, afin que cet effet soit compris au partage, comme les autres biens de la succession. → CC 1825, art. 1305

Art. 1228. A. Les enfants ou descendants venant à la succession de leurs pères, ou mères, ou autres ascendants, doivent rapporter tout ce qu'ils ont reçu d'eux par donations entre vifs, directement ou indirectement ; et ils ne peuvent réclamer les legs à eux faits, à moins que les dons et legs ne leur aient été faits expressément à titre d'avantage ou hors part.

B. Cette règle a lieu, soit que les enfants ou descendants viennent à la succession de leurs ascendants comme héritiers testamentaires ou comme héritiers légitimes. [Loi de 2001, n° 572, §1] → CC 1825, art. 1306

Art. 1229. L'obligation de rapporter, est fondée sur l'égalité qui doit être naturellement gardée entre les enfants et autres descendants légitimes, venant à partager entre eux la succession de leur père et mère et autres ascendants, et sur ce qu'on présume que ce qui a été donné ou légué aux enfants ou descendants par leurs ascendants, ne l'a été qu'en avancement de ce qu'ils pourraient espérer un jour dans leur succession. → CC 1825, art. 1307

Art. 1230. Ce rapport doit avoir lieu, soit que le donateur l'ait formellement ordonné, ou qu'il ait gardé le silence à cet égard, parce que le rapport est toujours présumé ordonné, s'il n'est précisément défendu. → CC 1825, art. 1308.

Art. 1231. Mais les choses données ou léguées aux enfants ou autres descendants par leurs ascendants, ne se rapportent point, si le donateur a formellement exprimé sa volonté, que ce qu'il donnait fût à titre d'avantage ou hors part, à moins que la valeur de l'objet donné n'excède la portion disponible, dans lequel cas, l'excédent sera sujet à rapport. → CC 1825, art. 1309

Art. 1232. La déclaration que le don ou legs est fait à titre d'avantage ou hors part, peut être faite dans l’acte qui contient ladite disposition, ou postérieurement par un acte passé devant un notaire et deux témoins, ou dans les dernières volontés et testament du donateur. Sauf mention expresse contraire, une déclaration de dispense de rapport effectuée dans les dernières volontés et testament du donateur prend effet comme une dispense de rapporter les donations faites avant et après la signature du testament. [Loi de 1986, n° 246, §1]

Art. 1233. La déclaration que le don ou le legs est à titre d'avantage ou hors part, peut être faite en d'autres termes équivalents, pourvu qu'ils indiquent d'une manière non équivoque, que telle a été la volonté du donateur. → CC 1825, art. 1311

Art. 1234. Si en calculant la valeur des dons faits à titre d'avantage ou hors part ou avec dispense de rapport, avec celle des autres biens qui restent dans l'hérédité, les autres enfants ne se trouvent pas avoir leur légitime sur le total, le donataire sera tenu de rapporter à ses cohéritiers jusqu'à concurrence de leur légitime, quand bien même il voudrait se tenir au don et renoncer à l'hérédité. Dans cette supputation de la légitime, il faut compter ce que les ascendants ont donné ou légué non seulement à leurs enfants, mais encore à toutes les autres personnes parentes ou étrangères. → CC 1825, art. 1312

Art. 1235. Le droit de demander le rapport est limité aux descendants au premier degré ayant qualité d’héritiers réservataires, et ne s’applique qu’aux donations faites dans les trois ans avant le décès, leur valeur étant estimée à la date de la donation. Toute disposition contraire du Code civil est ainsi abrogée. [Loi de 1996, 1re session extr., n° 77, §1]  

Art. 1236. [Abrogé par la loi de 1990, n° 147, §3, en vigueur le 1er juillet 1990]

Art. 1237. Si les enfants ou autres descendants légitimes qui ont des biens ou legs sujets au rapport, renoncent à la succession de l'ascendant de qui ils tiennent ces biens, ils peuvent retenir le don ou réclamer le legs à eux fait, sans être assujettis à aucun rapport.

Néanmoins, si ce qui reste dans l’hérédité ne suffit pas pour la légitime des autres enfants, en comprenant dans les biens du défunt ceux qu'aurait dû rapporter celui qui a renoncé à l'hérédité, s'il se fût rendu héritier, il sera tenu de rapporter jusqu'à concurrence de ce qui manque pour compléter cette légitime. → CC 1825, art. 1315

Art. 1238. A. Pour que les descendants soient sujets au rapport, ainsi qu'il est prescrit dans les articles précédents, il faut qu'ils viennent comme héritiers à la succession de l'ascendant de qui ils tiennent immédiatement le don ou le legs.

B. Ainsi, les petits-enfants à qui il a été fait quelque don ou legs par leur aïeul ou aïeule, depuis la mort de leur père ou mère, sont obligés au rapport, lorsqu'ils viennent à la succession de cet aïeul ou aïeule, soit avec les autres petits-enfants, soit par représentation avec leurs oncles ou tantes, frères ou sœurs de leur père ou mère, parce que lesdits aïeul ou aïeule sont présumés avoir voulu leur donner ou léguer par anticipation. [Loi de 1990, n° 147, §1, en vigueur le 1er juillet 1990 ; loi de 1995, n° 1180, §1, en vigueur le 1er janvier 1996] → CC 1825, art. 1316

Art. 1239. A. Mais les dons et legs faits à un petit-enfant par son aïeul ou aïeule, pendant la vie de son père, sont toujours réputés faits avec dispense de rapport.

B. Le père, venant à la succession de l'aïeul et de l'aïeule, n'est pas tenu de rapporter les dons et legs ainsi faits à son fils*.  [Loi de 1990, n° 147, §1, en vigueur le 1er juillet 1990 ; loi de 1995, n° 1180, §1, en vigueur le 1er janvier 1996] → CC1825 art. 1317

* NdT : Texte inchangé depuis 1825, l’anglais traduisant « l'aïeul et de l'aïeule » par « grandfather » et « fils » par « child ».

Art. 1240. Pareillement, le petit-enfant venant de son chef à la succession de son aïeul ou aïeule, n'est pas tenu de rapporter le don fait à son père, même quand il aurait accepté la succession de celui-ci ; mais si ce petit-enfant ne vient que par représentation, il doit rapporter ce qui avait été donné à son père, même dans le cas où il aurait répudié sa succession. → CC 1825 art. 1318

Art. 1241. Ce qui a été dit dans les trois précédents articles, des petits-enfants venant à la succession de leur aïeul ou aïeule, doit s'entendre aussi des arrière-petits-enfants et autres descendants légitimes venant à succéder à leurs ascendants, soit de leur chef, soit par représentation. → CC 1825 art. 1319