Louisiana Civil Code

Table of Contents (Download PDF)

SECTION 3 - ACCESSION IN RELATION TO MOVABLES

Art. 507. In the absence of other provisions of law or contract, the consequences of accession as between movables are determined according to the following rules. [Acts 1979, No. 180, §1]

Art. 508. Things are divided into principal and accessory. For purposes of accession as between movables, an accessory is a corporeal movable that serves the use, ornament, or complement of the principal thing.

In the case of a principal thing consisting of a movable construction permanently attached to the ground, its accessories include things that would constitute its component parts under Article 466 if the construction were immovable. [Acts 1979, No. 180, §1; Acts 2008, No. 632, §1, eff. July 1, 2008]

Art. 509. In case of doubt as to which is a principal thing and which is an accessory, the most valuable, or the most bulky if value is nearly equal, shall be deemed to be principal. [Acts 1979, No. 180, §1]

Art. 510. When two corporeal movables are united to form a whole, and one of them is an accessory of the other, the whole belongs to the owner of the principal thing. The owner of the principal thing is bound to reimburse the owner of the accessory its value. The owner of the accessory may demand that it be separated and returned to him, although the separation may cause some injury to the principal thing, if the accessory is more valuable than the principal and has been used without his knowledge. [Acts 1979, No. 180, §1]

Art. 511. When one uses materials of another to make a new thing, the thing belongs to the owner of the materials, regardless of whether they may be given their earlier form. The owner is bound to reimburse the value of the workmanship.

Nevertheless, when the value of the workmanship substantially exceeds that of the materials, the thing belongs to him who made it. In this case, he is bound to reimburse the owner of the materials their value. [Acts 1979, No. 180, §1]

Art. 512. If the person who made the new thing was in bad faith, the court may award its ownership to the owner of the materials. [Acts 1979, No. 180, §1]

Art. 513. When one used partly his own materials and partly the materials of another to make a new thing, unless the materials can be conveniently separated, the thing belongs to the owners of the materials in indivision. The share of one is determined in proportion to the value of his materials and of the other in proportion to the value of his materials and workmanship. [Acts 1979, No. 180, §1]

Art. 514. When a new thing is formed by the mixture of materials of different owners, and none of them may be considered as principal, an owner who has not consented to the mixture may demand separation if it can be conveniently made.

If separation cannot be conveniently made, the thing resulting from the mixture belongs to the owners of the materials in indivision. The share of each is determined in proportion to the value of his materials.

One whose materials are far superior in value in comparison with those of any one of the others, may claim the thing resulting from the mixture. He is then bound to reimburse the others the value of their materials. [Acts 1979, No. 180, §1]

Art. 515. When an owner of materials that have been used without his knowledge for the making of a new thing acquires the ownership of that thing, he may demand that, in lieu of the ownership of the new thing, materials of the same species, quantity, weight, measure and quality or their value be delivered to him. [Acts 1979, No. 180, §1]

Art. 516. One who uses a movable of another, without his knowledge, for the making of a new thing may be liable for the payment of damages. [Acts 1979, No. 180, §1]

 

CHAPTER 3 - TRANSFER OF OWNERSHIP BY AGREEMENT

Art. 517. The ownership of an immovable is voluntarily transferred by a contract between the owner and the transferee that purports to transfer the ownership of the immovable. The transfer of ownership takes place between the parties by the effect of the agreement and is not effective against third persons until the contract is filed for registry in the conveyance records of the parish in which the immovable is located. [Acts 1979, No. 180, §1; Acts 2005, No. 169, §2, eff. July 1, 2006; Acts 2005, 1st Ex. Sess., No. 13, §1, eff. Nov. 29, 2005]

Art. 518.  The ownership of a movable is voluntarily transferred by a contract between the owner and the transferee that purports to transfer the ownership of the movable. Unless otherwise provided, the transfer of ownership takes place as between the parties by the effect of the agreement and against third persons when the possession of the movable is delivered to the transferee.

When possession has not been delivered, a subsequent transferee to whom possession is delivered acquires ownership provided he is in good faith. Creditors of the transferor may seize the movable while it is still in his possession. [Acts 1984, No. 331, §2, eff. Jan. 1, 1985]

Art. 519. When a movable is in the possession of a third person, the assignment of the action for the recovery of that movable suffices for the transfer of its ownership. [Acts 1979, No. 180, §1]

Art. 520. [Repealed. Acts 1981, No. 125, §1]

Art. 521. One who has possession of a lost or stolen thing may not transfer its ownership to another. For purposes of this Chapter, a thing is stolen when one has taken possession of it without the consent of its owner. A thing is not stolen when the owner delivers it or transfers its ownership to another as a result of fraud. [Acts 1979, No. 180, §1]

Art. 522. A transferee of a corporeal movable in good faith and for fair value retains the ownership of the thing even though the title of the transferor is annulled on account of a vice of consent. [Acts 1979, No. 180, §1]

Art. 523. An acquirer of a corporeal movable is in good faith for purposes of this Chapter unless he knows, or should have known, that the transferor was not the owner. [Acts 1979, No. 180, §1]

Art. 524. The owner of a lost or stolen movable may recover it from a possessor who bought it in good faith at a public auction or from a merchant customarily selling similar things on reimbursing the purchase price.

The former owner of a lost, stolen, or abandoned movable that has been sold by authority of law may not recover it from the purchaser. [Acts 1979, No. 180, §1]

Art. 525. The provisions of this Chapter do not apply to movables that are required by law to be registered in public records. [Acts 1979, No. 180, §1]

 

CHAPTER 4 - PROTECTION OF OWNERSHIP

Art. 526. The owner of a thing is entitled to recover it from anyone who possesses or detains it without right and to obtain judgment recognizing his ownership and ordering delivery of the thing to him. [Acts 1979, No. 180, §1]

Art. 527. The evicted possessor, whether in good or in bad faith, is entitled to recover from the owner compensation for necessary expenses incurred for the preservation of the thing and for the discharge of private or public burdens. He is not entitled to recover expenses for ordinary maintenance or repairs. [Acts 1979, No. 180, §1]

Art. 528. An evicted possessor in good faith is entitled to recover from the owner his useful expenses to the extent that they have enhanced the value of the thing. [Acts 1979, No. 180, §1]

Art. 529. The possessor, whether in good or in bad faith, may retain possession of the thing until he is reimbursed for expenses and improvements which he is entitled to claim. [Acts 1979, No. 180, §1]

Art. 530. The possessor of a corporeal movable is presumed to be its owner. The previous possessor of a corporeal movable is presumed to have been its owner during the period of his possession.

These presumptions do not avail against a previous possessor who was dispossessed as a result of loss or theft. [Acts 1979, No. 180, §1]

Art. 531. One who claims the ownership of an immovable against another in possession must prove that he has acquired ownership from a previous owner or by acquisitive prescription. If neither party is in possession, he need only prove a better title. [Acts 1979, No. 180, §1]

Art. 532. When the titles of the parties are traced to a common author, he is presumed to be the previous owner. [Acts 1979, No. 180, §1]

SECTION 3 - DE L'ACCESSION RELATIVEMENT AUX BIENS MEUBLES

Art. 507. En l'absence d'autres dispositions légales ou contractuelles, les effets de l'accession mobilière sont déterminés selon les règles suivantes. [Loi de 1979, n˚ 180, §1]

Art. 508. Les choses sont principales ou accessoires. Aux fins de l'accession mobilière, un accessoire est un bien meuble corporel qui sert à l'usage, l'ornement ou le complément de la chose principale.

Lorsqu’une chose principale consiste en une construction mobilière attachée au sol de manière permanente, ses accessoires comprennent les choses qui en auraient été les parties composantes en vertu de l'article 466 si la construction avait été immobilière. [Loi de 1979, n˚ 180, §1 ; loi de 2008, n˚ 632, §1, en vigueur le 1er juillet 2008]

Art. 509. En cas de doute sur la qualité principale ou accessoire de la chose, est réputée principale, la plus considérable en valeur, ou en volume, si les valeurs sont à peu près égales. [Loi de 1979, n˚ 180, §1]

Art. 510. Lorsque deux biens meubles corporels sont unis de manière à former un tout et que l'un d'entre eux est l'accessoire de l'autre, le tout appartient au propriétaire de la chose principale. Le propriétaire de la chose principale est tenu de rembourser au propriétaire de l'accessoire la valeur de ce dernier. Le propriétaire de l'accessoire peut demander à ce que ce dernier soit séparé et lui soit rendu, même lorsqu'il pourrait en résulter quelque dégradation de la chose principale, lorsque l'accessoire est plus considérable en valeur que le principal et a été utilisé à son insu. [Loi de 1979, n˚ 180, §1]

Art. 511. Lorsqu'une personne emploie des matériaux d'autrui, à former une nouvelle chose, cette chose appartient au propriétaire des matériaux, qu‘ils puissent ou non reprendre leur première forme. Le propriétaire est tenu de rembourser la valeur de la main-d'œuvre.

Néanmoins, lorsque la valeur de la main-d'œuvre surpasse de beaucoup celle des matériaux employés, la chose appartient à celui qui l'a formée. Dans ce cas, ce dernier est tenu de rembourser la valeur des matériaux à leur propriétaire. [Loi de 1979, n˚ 180, §1]

Art. 512. Lorsque la personne qui a formé la nouvelle chose était de mauvaise foi, le juge peut octroyer la propriété de la chose au propriétaire des matériaux. [Loi de 1979, n˚ 180, §1]

Art. 513. Lorsqu'une personne a employé en partie ses propres matériaux et en partie ceux d'autrui pour former une nouvelle chose, à moins que les matériaux puissent être commodément séparés, la chose appartient aux propriétaires des matériaux en indivision. La part de l'un est déterminée en raison de la valeur de ses matériaux et celle de l'autre, en raison de la valeur de ses matériaux et de sa main-d'œuvre. [Loi de 1979, n˚ 180, §1]

Art. 514. Lorsqu'une nouvelle chose est formée par le mélange de matériaux appartenant à différents propriétaires, et qu'aucun de ces matériaux ne peut être considéré comme principal, celui qui n'a pas consenti au mélange peut demander la séparation lorsqu'elle peut être faite commodément.

Si la séparation ne peut être faite commodément, la chose résultant du mélange appartient en indivision aux propriétaires des matériaux. La part de chacun est déterminée dans la proportion de la valeur des matériaux appartenant à chacun d'eux.

Celui dont les matériaux sont de beaucoup supérieurs en valeur à ceux des autres, peut prétendre à la chose résultant du mélange. Il est ensuite tenu de rembourser aux autres la valeur de leurs matériaux. [Loi de 1979, n˚ 180, §1]

Art. 515. Lorsque le propriétaire dont les matériaux ont été employés à son insu pour former une nouvelle chose en acquiert la propriété, il peut réclamer la restitution de matériaux de même nature, quantité, poids, mesure et qualité ou leur valeur, au lieu de la propriété de la nouvelle chose. [Loi de 1979, n˚ 180, §1]

Art. 516. Celui qui emploie le meuble d'autrui, à son insu, pour former une nouvelle chose peut être condamné à des dommages-intérêts. [Loi de 1979, n˚ 180, §1]

 

CHAPITRE 3 - DU TRANSFERT DU DROIT DE PROPRIÉTÉ PAR CONTRAT

Art. 517. La propriété d'un immeuble est volontairement transférée par contrat entre le propriétaire et le cessionnaire aux fins du transfert de la propriété de l'immeuble. Le transfert de propriété a lieu entre les parties par l'effet de l'accord et n'est pas opposable aux tiers jusqu'à ce que le contrat soit inscrit au registre foncier de la paroisse* où se situe l'immeuble. [Loi de 1979, n˚ 180, §1 ; loi de 2005, n˚ 169, §2, entrée en vigueur le 1er juillet 2006 ; loi de 2005, 1re session extra., n˚ 13, §1, entrée en vigueur le 29 novembre 2005]

* NdT : La Louisiane a conservé la paroisse comme division territoriale. Celle-ci est l’équivalent du comté dans les autres états.

Art. 518. La propriété d'un meuble est volontairement transférée par contrat entre le propriétaire et le cessionnaire aux fins du transfert de la propriété du meuble. Sauf disposition contraire, le transfert de propriété a lieu entre les parties par l'effet de l'accord et est opposable aux tiers lorsque le cessionnaire est mis en possession du meuble.

Lorsqu'il n'y a pas eu mise en possession, un nouveau cessionnaire qui a été mis en possession devient propriétaire pourvu qu'il soit de bonne foi. Les créanciers du cédant peuvent saisir le meuble lorsqu'il est toujours en sa possession. [Loi de 1984, n˚ 331, §2, entrée en vigueur le 1er janvier 1985]

Art. 519. Quand le meuble est en possession d'un tiers, la cession de l'action en répétition du meuble suffit au transfert de propriété. [Loi de 1979, n˚ 180, §1]

Art. 520 [Abrogé par la loi de 1981, n˚ 125, §1]

Art. 521. Celui qui a en sa possession une chose perdue ou volée ne peut en transférer la propriété à autrui. Aux fins du présent chapitre, une chose est volée lorsqu'une personne en a pris possession sans le consentement de son propriétaire. Une chose n'est pas volée lorsque sa délivrance ou le transfert de sa propriété à autrui par le propriétaire résulte d'une fraude. [Loi de 1979, n˚ 180, §1]

Art. 522. Le cessionnaire de bonne foi d'un meuble corporel cédé à sa juste valeur conserve la propriété de la chose même si le titre du cédant est annulé pour vice du consentement. [Loi de 1979, n˚ 180, §1]

Art. 523. L'acquéreur d'un meuble corporel est de bonne foi aux fins du présent chapitre sauf s'il savait ou aurait dû savoir que le cédant n'était pas le propriétaire. [Loi de 1979, n˚ 180, §1]

Art. 524. Le propriétaire d'un meuble perdu ou volé peut le recouvrer du possesseur qui l'a acheté de bonne foi dans une vente publique ou auprès d'un commerçant vendant habituellement des choses pareilles, en lui remboursant le prix qu'il lui a coûté.

L'ancien propriétaire d'un meuble perdu, volé ou abandonné qui a été vendu par autorité de justice ne peut le recouvrer de l'acheteur. [Loi de 1979, n˚ 180, §1]

Art. 525. Les dispositions du présent chapitre ne s'appliquent pas aux meubles dont la loi exige qu'ils soient inscrits aux registres publics. [Loi de 1979, n˚ 180, §1]

 

CHAPITRE 4 - DE LA PROTECTION DU DROIT DE PROPRIÉTÉ

Art. 526. Le propriétaire d'une chose a le droit de la recouvrer de quiconque la possède ou la détient sans droit et d'obtenir un jugement reconnaissant sa propriété et ordonnant que la chose lui soit délivrée. [Loi de 1979, n˚ 180, §1]

Art. 527. Le possesseur évincé, qu'il soit de bonne ou de mauvaise foi, a le droit de recouvrer du propriétaire une compensation pour les dépenses nécessaires à la préservation de la chose et au règlement des charges privées ou publiques. Il n'a pas le droit de recouvrer les dépenses d'entretien ou de réparations ordinaires. [Loi de 1979, n˚ 180, §1]

Art. 528. Un possesseur de bonne foi évincé a le droit de recouvrer du propriétaire ses dépenses utiles dans la mesure où celles-ci ont amélioré la valeur de la chose. [Loi de 1979, n˚ 180, §1]

Art. 529. Le possesseur, qu'il soit de bonne ou de mauvaise foi, peut rester en possession de la chose jusqu'au remboursement des dépenses et des améliorations qu'il est en droit de réclamer. [Loi de 1979, n˚ 180, §1]

Art. 530. Le possesseur d'un meuble corporel est présumé en être le propriétaire. L'ancien possesseur d'un meuble corporel est présumé en être le propriétaire pendant sa possession.

Ces présomptions ne valent pas à l'encontre d'un ancien possesseur qui a été dépossédé par perte ou par vol. [Loi de 1979, n˚ 180, §1]

Art. 531. Celui qui revendique la propriété d'un immeuble en possession d'un tiers doit apporter la preuve qu'il a acquis la propriété d'un propriétaire antérieur ou par prescription acquisitive. Lorsqu'aucune des parties n'est en possession, il lui suffit de prouver un meilleur titre. [Loi de 1979, n˚ 180, §1]

Art. 532. Lorsque les titres des parties sont attribuables à un auteur commun, celui-ci est présumé être le propriétaire antérieur. [Loi de 1979, n˚ 180, §1]