Louisiana Civil Code

Table of Contents (Download PDF)

TITLE XVI - SURETYSHIP

 

CHAPTER 1 - NATURE AND EXTENT OF SURETYSHIP

Art. 3035. Suretyship is an accessory contract by which a person binds himself to a creditor to fulfill the obligation of another upon the failure of the latter to do so. [Acts 1987, No. 409, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1988]

Art. 3036. Suretyship may be established for any lawful obligation, which, with respect to the suretyship, is the principal obligation.

The principal obligation may be subject to a term or condition, may be presently existing, or may arise in the future. [Amended by Acts 1979, No. 711, §1; Acts 1987, No. 409, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1988]

Art. 3037. One who ostensibly binds himself as a principal obligor to satisfy the present or future obligations of another is nonetheless considered a surety if the principal cause of the contract with the creditor is to guarantee performance of such obligations.

A creditor in whose favor a surety and principal obligor are bound together as principal obligors in solido may presume they are equally concerned in the matter until he clearly knows of their true relationship. [Acts 1987, No. 409, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1988]

Art. 3038. Suretyship must be express and in writing. [Acts 1987, No. 409, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1988]

Art. 3039. Suretyship is established upon receipt by the creditor of the writing evidencing the surety's obligation. The creditor's acceptance is presumed and no notice of acceptance is required. [Acts 1987, No. 409, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1988]

Art. 3040. Suretyship may be qualified, conditioned, or limited in any lawful manner. [Acts 1987, No. 409, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1988]

CHAPTER 2 - KINDS OF SURETYSHIP

Art. 3041. There are three kinds of suretyship: commercial suretyship, legal suretyship, and ordinary suretyship. [Acts 1987, No. 409, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1988]

Art. 3042. A commercial suretyship is one in which:

(1) The surety is engaged in a surety business;

(2) The principal obligor or the surety is a business corporation, partnership, or other business entity;

(3) The principal obligation arises out of a commercial transaction of the principal obligor; or

(4) The suretyship arises out of a commercial transaction of the surety. [Acts 1987, No. 409, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1988]

Art. 3043. A legal suretyship is one given pursuant to legislation, administrative act or regulation, or court order. [Acts 1987, No. 409, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1988]

Art. 3044. An ordinary suretyship is one that is neither a commercial suretyship nor a legal suretyship.

An ordinary suretyship must be strictly construed in favor of the surety. [Acts 1987, No. 409, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1988]

CHAPTER 3 - THE EFFECTS OF SURETYSHIP BETWEEN THE SURETY AND CREDITOR

Art. 3045. A surety, or each surety when there is more than one, is liable to the creditor in accordance with the provisions of this Chapter, for the full performance of the obligation of the principal obligor, without benefit of division or discussion, even in the absence of an express agreement of solidarity. [Acts 1987, No. 409, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1988]

Art. 3046. The surety may assert against the creditor any defense to the principal obligation that the principal obligor could assert except lack of capacity or discharge in bankruptcy of the principal obligor. [Acts 1987, No. 409, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1988]

CHAPTER 4 - THE EFFECTS OF SURETYSHIP BETWEEN THE SURETY AND PRINCIPAL OBLIGOR

Art. 3047. A surety has the right of subrogation, the right of reimbursement, and the right to require security from the principal obligor. [Acts 1987, No. 409, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1988]

Art. 3048. The surety who pays the principal obligation is subrogated by operation of law to the rights of the creditor. [Acts 1987, No. 409, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1988]

Art. 3049. A surety who pays the creditor is entitled to reimbursement from the principal obligor. He may not recover reimbursement until the principal obligation is due and exigible.

A surety for multiple solidary obligors may recover from any of them reimbursement of the whole amount he has paid the creditor. [Acts 1987, No. 409, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1988]

Art. 3050. A surety who in good faith pays the creditor when the principal obligation is extinguished, or when the principal obligor had the means of defeating it, is nevertheless entitled to reimbursement from the principal obligor if the surety made a reasonable effort to notify the principal obligor that the creditor was insisting on payment or if the principal obligor was apprised that the creditor was insisting on payment.

The surety's rights against the creditor are not thereby excluded. [Acts 1987, No. 409, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1988]

Art. 3051. A surety may not recover from the principal obligor, by way of subrogation or reimbursement, the amount paid the creditor if the principal obligor also pays the creditor for want of being warned by the surety of the previous payment.

In these circumstances, the surety may recover from the creditor. [Acts 1987, No. 409, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1988]

Art. 3052. A surety may not recover from the principal obligor more than he paid to secure a discharge, but he may recover by subrogation such attorney's fees and interest as are owed with respect to the principal obligation. [Acts 1987, No. 409, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1988]

Art. 3053. A surety, before making payment, may demand security from the principal obligor to guarantee his reimbursement when:

(1) The surety is sued by the creditor;

(2) The principal obligor is insolvent, unless the principal obligation is such that its performance does not require his solvency;

(3) The principal obligor fails to perform an act promised in return for the suretyship; or

(4) The principal obligation is due or would be due but for an extension of its term not consented to by the surety.

The principal obligor may refuse to give security if the principal obligation is extinguished or if he has a defense against it. [Acts 1987, No. 409, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1988]

Art. 3054. If, within ten days after the delivery of a written demand for the security, the principal obligor fails to provide the required security or fails to secure the discharge of the surety, the surety has an action to require the principal obligor to deposit into the registry of the court funds sufficient to satisfy the surety's obligation to the creditor as a pledge for the principal obligor's duty to reimburse the surety. [Acts 1987, No. 409, §1, eff. Jan. 1, 1988]

TITRE XVI. DU CAUTIONNEMENT

 

CHAPITRE 1 - DE LA NATURE ET DE L’ÉTENDUE DU CAUTIONNEMENT

Art. 3035. Le cautionnement est une promesse accessoire par laquelle une personne s’engage vis-à-vis d’un créancier à satisfaire à l’obligation d’une autre personne si le débiteur n’y satisfait pas lui-même. [Loi de 1987, n°409, § 1, entrée en vigueur le 1er janvier 1988].

Art. 3036. Le cautionnement peut être établi pour toute obligation licite qui, par rapport au cautionnement, constitue l’obligation principale.

L’obligation principale peut faire l’objet d’un terme ou d’une condition, peut-être déjà existante, ou peut n’apparaître que dans le futur. [Modifié par une loi de 19797, n°711, § 1, Loi de 1987, n°409, § 1, entrée en vigueur le 1er janvier 1988].

Art. 3037. Celui qui s’engage en apparence comme créancier principal à satisfaire à l’obligation présente ou future d’une autre personne est considéré néanmoins comme une caution si la raison principale du contrat avec le créancier est de garantir de telles obligations.

Un créancier en faveur de qui une caution et un débiteur principal se sont engagés solidairement comme créanciers principaux peut présumer qu’ils sont engagés tous deux de cette manière jusqu’à ce qu’il ait connaissance de leur véritable relation. [Loi de 1987, n°409, § 1, entrée en vigueur le 1er janvier 1988].

Art. 3038. Le cautionnement doit être exprès et écrit. [Loi de 1987, n°409, § 1, entrée en vigueur le 1er janvier 1988].

Art. 3039. Le cautionnement est établi à réception par le créancier de l’écrit attestant de l’obligation de la caution. L’acceptation du créancier est présumée et aucune notification d’acceptation n’est requise. [Loi de 1987, n°409, § 1, entrée en vigueur le 1er janvier 1988].

Art. 3040. Le cautionnement peut être infléchi, conditionnel ou limité de toutes les manières que la loi autorise. [Loi de 1987, n°409, § 1, entrée en vigueur le 1er janvier 1988].

CHAPITRE 2 - DES DIFFÉRENTES SORTES DE CAUTIONNEMENT

Art. 3041. Il y a trois types de cautionnement : le cautionnement commercial, le cautionnement légal et le cautionnement ordinaire. [Loi de 1987, n°409, § 1, entrée en vigueur le 1er janvier 1988].

Art. 3042. Le cautionnement commercial est celui dans lequel :

(1) La caution est un professionnel du cautionnement;

(2) Le débiteur principal ou la caution est une société commerciale, une société en nom collectif, ou toute autre organisation commerciale ;

(3) L’obligation principale provient d’une transaction commerciale du débiteur principal;

(4) Le cautionnement prend sa source dans une transaction commerciale de la caution. [Loi de 1987, n°409, § 1, entrée en vigueur le 1er janvier 1988].

Art. 3043. Le cautionnement légal est un cautionnement créé en vertu de la loi, d’un acte administratif ou réglementaire, ou d’une ordonnance judiciaire. [Loi de 1987, n°409, § 1, entrée en vigueur le 1er janvier 1988].

Art. 3044. Le cautionnement ordinaire est un cautionnement qui n’est ni commercial ni légal. Ce cautionnement doit être interprété strictement en faveur de la caution. [Loi de 1987, n°409, § 1, entrée en vigueur le 1er janvier 1988].

CHAPITRE 3 - DES EFFETS DU CAUTIONNEMENT ENTRE LA CAUTION ET LE CRÉANCIER

Art. 3045. Une caution, ou chaque caution lorsqu’elles sont plusieurs, est responsable envers le créancier dans les termes du présent chapitre, de l’exécution pleine et entière de l’obligation du débiteur principal, sans bénéfice de division ou de discussion, même en l’absence d’un accord exprès de solidarité. [Loi de 1987, n°409, § 1, entrée en vigueur le 1er janvier 1988].

Art. 3046. La caution peut opposer à l’encontre du créancier tout moyen de défense que le débiteur principal pouvait lui-même opposer, à l’exception de l’incapacité ou de la libération de la dette suite à la faillite du débiteur principal. [Loi de 1987, n°409, § 1, entrée en vigueur le 1er janvier 1988].

CHAPITRE 4 - DES EFFETS DU CAUTIONNEMENT ENTRE LA CAUTION ET LE DÉBITEUR PRINCIPAL

Art. 3047. La caution bénéficie d’un recours subrogatoire, d’une action en répétition et du droit d’exiger une sûreté du débiteur principal. [Loi de 1987, n°409, § 1, entrée en vigueur le 1er janvier 1988].

Art. 3048. La caution qui paie l’obligation principale est subrogée de plein droit à tous les droits du créancier. [Loi de 1987, n°409, § 1, entrée en vigueur le 1er janvier 1988].

Art. 3049. La caution qui paie le créancier a une action en répétition contre le débiteur principal. Elle ne peut pas exercer cette action en répétition avant que l’obligation principale ne soit échue et exigible.

La caution de plusieurs débiteurs solidaires peut répéter contre chacun d’eux l’intégralité de la somme qu’elle a payée au créancier. [Loi de 1987, n°409, § 1, entrée en vigueur le 1er janvier 1988].

Art. 3050. La caution qui de bonne foi paie le créancier lorsque l’obligation principale est éteinte, ou lorsque le débiteur principal avait les moyens de la tenir en échec, a néanmoins une action en répétition contre le débiteur principal. Cette action est ouverte lorsque la caution a fait un effort raisonnable pour avertir le débiteur principal que le créancier exigeait le paiement ou lorsque le débiteur principal en était informé.

Les droits de la caution à l’encontre du créancier ne sont pas pour autant exclus. [Loi de 1987, n°409, § 1, entrée en vigueur le 1er janvier 1988].

Art. 3051. La caution ne peut obtenir du débiteur principal, par le biais de la subrogation ou de l’action en répétition, l’intégralité de la somme qu’elle a payée au créancier lorsque le débiteur principal paie également ce créancier faute d’avoir été averti par la caution du paiement précédent.

En de telles circonstances, la caution peut exercer un recours contre le créancier. [Loi de 1987, n°409, § 1, entrée en vigueur le 1er janvier 1988].

Art. 3052. La caution ne peut exercer de recours contre le débiteur principal pour ce qu’elle a payé en plus pour se libérer, mais elle peut recouvrer par subrogation les frais d’avocat et intérêts liés à l’obligation principale. [Loi de 1987, n°409, § 1, entrée en vigueur le 1er janvier 1988].

Art. 3053. Avant de faire le paiement, la caution peut demander une sûreté du débiteur principal afin de garantir son remboursement, dans les cas suivants :

(1) La caution est poursuivie par le créancier ;

(2) Le débiteur principal est insolvable, à moins que l’obligation principale soit telle que son exécution ne requière pas sa solvabilité ;

(3) Le débiteur principal n’a pas exécuté l’acte promis en retour du cautionnement ; ou

(4) L’obligation principale est échue ou serait échue s’il n’y avait eu prorogation de terme qui a été accordée sans le consentement de la caution.

Le débiteur principal peut refuser d’octroyer une sûreté si l’obligation principale est éteinte ou s’il dispose d’un moyen de défense. [Loi de 1987, n°409, § 1, entrée en vigueur le 1er janvier 1988].

Art. 3054. Lorsque dans un délai de dix jours après la délivrance d’une demande écrite de constitution de sûreté, le débiteur principal échoue à fournir celle-ci ou échoue à garantir la libération de la caution, la caution a une action pour exiger du débiteur principal de consigner au tribunal les fonds suffisants afin d’exécuter l’obligation de la caution envers le créancier, en gage de l’exécution du devoir du débiteur principal de rembourser la caution. [Loi de 1987, n°409, § 1, entrée en vigueur le 1er janvier 1988].